Pending Legislation In U.S. Congress, Part I: FY 2021 NDAA and FISA Reauthorization

Normally, a FISA reauthorization would be considered must pass like an NDAA, but this year may be different.   

As Congress returns from an eventful summer recess, it is possible technology focused and related legislation is passed or advances towards passage before the body leaves Washington in late September. However, it is just as likely, possibly even more, that Congress punts everything except for a measure to keep the government funded through the November election. This week, we will explore some of the bills that may become law. Today’s piece is on the FY 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) and the lapsed provisions in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

FY 2021 NDAA

Congress will almost certainly pass its annual policy and authorization bill for the Department of Defense (DOD) as it has done for every year since FY 1962. Any more, this bill is laden with technology provisions, most of which are oriented towards national security programs, but not always because the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) is considered must-pass legislation, it attracts some legislation that is non-defense. For example, the revamp of how the United States government buys and develops information technology programs, the “Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act” (FITARA) (P.L. 113-291), was enacted as part of the FY 2015 NDAA.

The House and Senate have passed their respective bills: the “William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (H.R.6395) and the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021“ (S.4049) and have already started work on resolving differences between the two packages. However, over the last decade or so, the NDAA has been one of the last major bills passed each calendar year, and it is possible this legislation will not reach the President’s desk until late December.

The base bill put on the floor of the House contained a range of cybersecurity provisions. The DOD’s requirement that it must submit its cybersecurity and information technology (IT) budget would be broadened to include cyber mission force and a its new cyber operations force budgets. The Cyberspace Solarium Commission’s (CSC) structure would be changed and would be extended. The DOD would need to study and consider replicating an entity inside the Navy that has been researching and pioneering cyber warfare. The DOD’s Principal Cyber Advisor would be invested with the authority to manage the Pentagon’s role as the sector-specific agency (SSA) for the Defense Industrial Base (DIB) under Presidential Policy Directive- 21. The bill also increased the DOD’s reporting requirements to Congress regarding compromises of its system and exceptions to its IT policies with the goal of creating a baseline to help the Pentagon manage its cyber risks and tradeoffs. The DOD would determine whether a current public-private partnership on cybersecurity is working and should be extended.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) would need to submit a report on the feasibility of an Integrated Cyber Center housed at its National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC). DHS would need to work with the DOD, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and National Security Agency (NSA) on whether it makes sense to create a joint collaboration environment to help shore up cybersecurity. The Pentagon would need to study and then implement a threat hunting program that would allow its personnel to go searching for vulnerabilities and cyber risks in the IT systems of DIB contractors. The DOD would be barred from contracting with entities that do not belong to the DIB threat intelligence sharing program. The bill would also permit the DOD to make grants to companies providing cybersecurity to small manufacturers in the U.S. The bill would establish a National Artificial Intelligence Initiative to support and foster a number of related activities including research and development, education, and training.

During floor consideration of H.R.6395, the House agreed to scores of amendments in two en bloc packages that contained most of the technology provisions made in order for consideration. Among the most notable of these provisions are the following, some of which have been considered by the House as standalone legislation:

The cybersecurity provisions in S.4049 would change, alter, or establish a range of programs and operations. The bill would modify the statutory duties of Department of Defense’s Principal Cyber Advisor to require that the person chosen for this role is a civilian at the Pentagon who holds a position requiring Senate confirmation. The DOD would need to develop and implement a framework for forward hunt operations (i.e. offensive cyber operations) to address some of the issues the committee’s oversight turned up. The focus on this exercise would be to get a better understanding on the utility and life span of intelligence gained through such operations. The Pentagon’s reporting duties after executing an offensive or defensive cyber operation would be expanded to include nations and entities with whom the United States is not at war. The Committee expanded the DOD’s required briefings on cyber operations, expressing frustration with the Department’s “unwillingness to keep the committee apprised of cyber operations conducted to gain access to adversary systems, including those conducted pursuant to standing military plans against military targets.”

There is language mandating that the DOD begin the process of harmonizing the Pentagon’s cyber capabilities and those provided by private sector contractors, much of which overlaps in the view of the committee. Cyber Command would receive expanded but necessarily acquisition authority as the service branches are to remain the entities undertaking large procurements. The Principal Cyber Advisor and head of Cyber Command would need to assess how well the DOD manages inter-agency conflict in the Pentagon and among Intelligence Community agencies in managing the process by which cyber operations are designed and executed, suggesting there is significant internal friction among the stakeholders. The DOD would need to conduct a pilot on the feasibility of adopting and using a commercial practice of speed-based cybersecurity metrics. The Pentagon would also need to better integrate its data collection and data analysis regarding potentially malicious or illegal activities by DOD employees and contractors (i.e. so-called insider threat).

The DOD would need “to develop a comprehensive plan, by February 1, 2021, for the deployment of commercial-off-the-shelf solutions on supplier networks to monitor the public-facing Internet attack surface of members of the defense industrial base (DIB)” that is intended to supplement the DOD’s new Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification and other DOD efforts to shore up the cybersecurity of its contractors. The bill would grant a DOD request to receive the authority to immediately react and respond to reported threats and penetrations to “operationally critical” DOD contractors’ systems and networks. The DOD would need “to conduct a baseline review of the Joint Regional Security Stacks (JRSS) activity to determine whether the initiative should continue, but as a program of record, or should be replaced by an improved design and modern technology.” The DOD would also receive limited flexibility to use Operation and Maintenance (O&M) “for cyber operations-peculiar capability development projects.” The committee also conditioned the availability of certain Office of the Secretary of Defense travel on fulfilling a requirement in the current year’s NDAA to submit “a report for the structuring and manning of information operations capabilities and forces” in the DOD, develop “a strategy for operations in the information environment” and to “conduct an information operations posture review.”

The Cyberspace Solarium Commission (CSC) would have its mandate extended so it could monitor, assess, and report on the implementation of its 75 recommendations made in March 2020. The bill includes a number of CSC recommendations, including:

  • Adding “a force structure assessment of the Department of Defense’s Cyber Operations Forces to future cyber posture reviews.”
  • “a report to the congressional defense committees, detailing the actions that the Secretary will undertake to ensure that the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, has enhanced authority, direction, and control of the Cyber Operations Forces and of the equipment budget that enables Cyber Operations Forces’ operations and readiness, beginning with fiscal year 2024 budget request.”
  • Assessing “options for establishing a cyber reserve force.”
  • A comprehensive plan for “[e]nsuring cyber resiliency of nuclear command and control system”
  • Requiring “the Secretary of Defense to establish policies and requirements for each major weapon system, and the priority critical infrastructure essential to the proper functioning of major weapon systems in broader mission areas, to be re-assessed for cyber vulnerabilities.”
  • Mandating that the Secretary of Defense “establish a threat intelligence sharing program to share threat intelligence with and obtain threat intelligence from the defense industrial base.”
  • Requiring the Pentagon “to conduct an assessment of the adequacy of threat hunting elements of the Cyber Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program and the need for continuous threat monitoring operations.”
  • Addressing “the risks to National Security Systems (NSSs) posed by quantum computing by requiring the Secretary of Defense to: (1) Complete an assessment of current and potential threats to critical NSSs and the standards used for quantum-resistant cryptography; and (2) Provide recommendations for research and development activities to secure NSSs.”
  • Study the feasibility of establishment of a National Cyber Director.

In terms of the provisions that were folded into the final Senate bill, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chair Ron Johnson (R-WI) succeeded in attached to the larger bill the “Cybersecurity Vulnerability Identification and Notification Act of 2019” (S.3045). S.3045 would expand the authority of Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s (CISA) National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) to issue subpoenas to internet service providers to obtain the identity of owners and operators of critical infrastructure subject to be drafted procedures and limits on how any information collected from subpoena is used and retained. The House’s counterpart bill, H.R.5680, was added as an amendment to H.R.6395, meaning the substance of the legislation will almost certainly be in the final NDAA. Also, an amendment was adopted to stimulate semiconductor manufacturing in the United States by creating a grant and tax incentive program at the Department of Commerce

There were other technology provisions added to the bill during debate. The following amendments were adopted on 2 July en bloc by unanimous consent:

  • The Department of Homeland of Security “shall produce a report on the state of digital content forgery technology” within one year of enactment and then every five years
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense, with appropriate representatives of the Armed Forces, shall brief the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the feasibility and the current status of assigning members of the Armed Forces on active duty to the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) of the Department of Defense.”
  • “[T]he Secretary of Homeland Security shall conduct a comprehensive review of the ability of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency to fulfill–
    • the missions of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency; and
    • the recommendations detailed in the report issued by the Cyberspace Solarium Commission”
  • The “Developing Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things Act” (DIGIT Act) (S.1611) that would require the Department of Commerce to “convene a working group of Federal stakeholders for the purpose of providing recommendations and a report to Congress relating to the aspects of the Internet of Things.”
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of the National Reconnaissance Office and the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, shall leverage, to the maximum extent practicable, the capabilities of United States industry, including through the use of commercial geospatial-intelligence services and acquisition of commercial satellite imagery.”
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense is authorized to establish a pilot program to explore the use of consumption-based solutions to address software-intensive warfighting capability” per a re commendation made by the Section 809 Panel.
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense shall complete a study on the cyberexploitation of the personal  information and accounts of members of the Armed Forces and their families.”
  • A modified version of the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act” (S.3189) that “would reassert U.S. and Western leadership by encouraging competition with Huawei that capitalizes on U.S. software advantages, accelerating development of an open-architecture model (known as O-RAN) that would allow for alternative vendors to enter the market for specific network components, rather than having to compete with Huawei end-to-end” according to a press release.

Additionally, a deal was struck to add the “Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (S.3905) to S.4049 but without a bill included in the package as reported out of the Senate Intelligence Committee: the “Foreign Influence Reporting in Elections Act” (FIRE Act) (S.2242).

FISA Reauthorization

At present, key surveillance authorities for new investigations have lapsed, and it does not appear Congress is close to a deal to restore and reform them, an unusual state of affairs, for since 11 September 2001, it has done so regularly. The House and Senate have both passed bills but have been unable to agree on the extent of reforms to Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) programs given antipathy from the Trump Administration on proposed changes and opposition from some Democrats and Republicans who want to see more significant reforms. It is always possible a compromise package is agreed to and then tacked onto the FY 2021 NDAA, a continuing resolution, or an omnibus appropriations bill as has happened before.

In March, the House passed the “USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020” (H.R. 6172) by a 278-136 vote, a bill to reauthorize three expiring FISA provisions used by the National Security Agency (NSA) primarily to conduct surveillance: the business records exception, roving wiretaps, and the “lone wolf” provision. Moreover, H.R. 6172 ends the NSA’s ability to use the so-called call detail record (CDR) program that had allowed the agency to access data on many billions of calls. Nonetheless, the NSA shut down the program in 2018 due to what it termed technical problems. This closure of the program was included in the bill even though the Trump Administration had explicitly requested it also be reauthorized.

These authorities had been extended in December 2019 to March 15, 2020. However, the Senate did not act immediately on the bill and opted instead to send a 77-day extension of these now lapsed authorities to the House, which did not to take up the bill. The Senate was at an impasse on how to proceed, for some Members did not favor the House reforms while others wanted to implement further changes to the FISA process. Consequently, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) promised amendment votes when the Senate took up H.R.6172, which it did in May. Thereafter, reforms House Democratic leadership tried adding to the bill failed to please stakeholders, leaving the chamber to squelch plans to send a revised bill to the Senate and instead ask for a conference, which is where matters currently stand.

As mentioned, H.R. 6172 would reauthorize the business records exception, which includes “any tangible thing,” in FISA first instituted in the “USA PATRIOT Act” in 2001 but would reform certain aspects of the program. For example, if the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or NSA is seeking a business record under FISA for which a law enforcement agency would need to obtain a warrant, then the FBI or NSA will also need to obtain a warrant. Currently, this is not the case. Additionally, under H.R.6172, the FISA application process under Section 215 could not be used to obtain a person’s cell site location or GPS information. However, the FBI or NSA would still be able to use Title I of FISA to seek cell site location or GPS data for purposes of conducting electronic surveillance related to alleged foreign intelligence. The bill would require that prosecutors must inform defendants of the evidence derived from electronic surveillance unless doing so would harm national security.

Moreover, records obtained under Section 215 could be retained no longer than five years subject to a number of exceptions that may serve to make this limitation a dead letter. For example, if such records are deemed to have a “secret meaning” or are certified by the FBI as being vital to national security, then such records may be held longer than five years. Given the tendency of agencies to read their authority as broadly as possible and the past record of IC agencies, it is likely these authorities will be stretched as far as legally possible. It bears note that all restrictions are prospective, meaning that current, ongoing uses of Section 215 would be exempted. The business records provision would be extended until December 1, 2023 as are the other two expiring authorities that permit so-called roving wiretaps and allow for surveillance of so-called “lone wolves.”

For FISA applications under Title I (i.e. electronic surveillance), any agency seeking a FISA order to surveil will need to disclose to the FISA court any information that may call into question the accuracy of the application or any doubtful information. Moreover, certain FISA applications to surveil Americans or residents would need to spell out the proposed investigative techniques to the FISA court. Moreover, any FISA application targeting U.S. officials or candidates for federal office must be approved by the Attorney General in writing before they can be submitted. H.R.6172 would permit the suspension or removal of any federal official, employee, or contractor for misconduct before the FISA court and increases criminal liability for violating FISA from five to eight years. Most of these reforms seem aimed at those Members, many of whom are Republican, that were alarmed by the defects in the FISA surveillance process of Trump Campaign associate Cater Page as turned up by the Department of Justice’s Office of the Inspector General investigation. Some of these Members were opposed to the House Judiciary Committee’s initial bill, which they thought did not implement sufficient reforms to the larger FISA process.

In May, the Senate amended and passed H.R. 6172 by an 80-16 vote. Consideration of the bill was stalled in March when some Senators pushed for amendments, a demand to which the Senate Majority Leader finally agreed, provided these amendments would need 60 votes to be adopted. Consequently, once COVID-19 legislation had been considered, the Senate returned to H.R.6172, and debated and voted upon three amendments, one of which was agreed to. Senators Pat Leahy (D-VT) and Mike Lee’s (R-UT) amendment to expand the amicus process during the FISA process prevailed by a 77-19 vote.

As mentioned, Wyden and Daines offered an amendment to narrow the Section 215 exception to the Fourth Amendment’s requirement that a search requires a warrant. Section 215 currently allows for FISA court approved searches of business records and all tangible things in the course of a national security investigation, and the underlying text of H.R. 6172 would exclude cell site location and GPS location from Section 215. The Wyden/Daines amendment would also exclude web browsing and search engine histories. However, the amendment failed to reach the 60-vote threshold necessary for adoption under the rule of debate for H.R. 6172, failing by one vote as four Senators did not vote.

In late May, it appeared as if the House would bring H.R. 6172 to the floor and possibly take a run at adding language that barely failed to get added during debate in the Senate that would further pare back the ability of federal law enforcement agencies to use the FISA process for surveillance. However, the Trump Administration more forcefully stated its objections to the amended bill, including a veto threat issued via Twitter, that caused Republican support for the bill to cave, and with it the chances of passage, for Republican votes were needed to pass the bill in the first place. Consequently, House Democratic Leadership explored the possibility of a clean vote on the Senate-amended bill, with the House Rules Committee reporting a rule for debate, but this effort was also scuttled as there were not the votes for passage of the bill to send it to the White House. Instead, House Democratic Leadership opted to go to conference committee, which succeeded in a 284-122 proxy vote, one of the first taken under the new procedure. Thereafter, the House named the following conferees: House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) and Ranking Member Jim Jordan (R-OH); House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Ranking Member Devin Nunes (R-CA) and Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-CA). The bill is being held at the desk in the Senate and Senate conferees have not been named, meaning the conference committee cannot formally begin.  

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by ArtTower from Pixabay

House Starts Consideration of Its NDAA

The House will consider scores of amendments to change US technology policy, including a number of implement the recommendations of a congressional cybersecurity panel. However, some may not be in the final NDAA.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

As is almost always the case, House Members are using the occasion of the annual consideration of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to offer a range of amendments to the House Rules Committee. Hundreds of amendments were submitted, and at the 17 July hearing, the Committee determined which would be made in order and allow to be debated on the House floor, including scores of technology amendments. Many of these amendments to the “William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (H.R.6395) would change US technology policy and funding, and some are complete bills the House has already passed, for inclusion in the NDAA increases the chances of enactment. Among the higher profile amendments made in order is one offered by Cyberspace Solarium Commission members that would establish a National Cyber Director position in the White House that the Senate declined to include in its FY 2021 NDAA, suggesting addition to the House’s bill does not necessarily this provision will make it into law.

Earlier today, the House began its consideration of H.R.6395, which may take up the better part of the week. The House Rules Committee made the following amendments in order to be offered during debate that pertain to technology:

The House Armed Services Committee has also released its Committee Report in two parts (Volume I and II) and detailed the overall funding authorized by the package:

H.R. 6395 supports an overall authorization of $740.5 billion dollars for our national defense. H.R. 6395 would authorize approximately $662.6 billion in discretionary spending for national defense and approximately $69.0 billion in discretionary spending for Over-seas Contingency Operations. This authorization level will allow our military to maintain readiness, expand capabilities, and invest in the new software and technologies required to secure our country.

The committee included a number of requests and directives of the DOD and other agencies, including but not limited to:

  • Report on Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification
    • The committee acknowledges that the Department of Defense has taken initial steps to ensure that its contractors are aware of the actions necessary to protect the government’s data and networks from cybersecurity threats. However, the committee is concerned that there remain key unanswered questions about how it will implement its cybersecurity framework, especially given the level of collaboration necessary between industry and government for its success. Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by January 15, 2021, regarding the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program.
  • Report on Ties between Russia and China
    • The Department of Defense has acknowledged that China and Russia are increasingly working in cooperation on a wide range of matters, including economically, politically, and militarily; and that the Department believes the growing ties between Russia and China are challenging the rules-based order and present a threat to U.S. national security interests. The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy highlights the joint force’s eroding competitive edge against China and Russia. The committee endeavors to fully understand the extent of the ties between Russia and China. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of National Intelligence, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to submit a report to the congressional defense committees and the congressional intelligence committees by March 1, 2021, on the relationship between China and Russia.
  • Fourth Estate Network Optimization
    • The committee recognizes the importance of creating efficiencies and cost savings within the Fourth Estate and across the Department of Defense, to include the consolidation of information technology services away from legacy common use information technology services into a single service provider (SSP). The committee notes that on August 15, 2019 the Deputy Secretary of Defense directed the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to execute such consolidation under the Fourth Estate Network Optimization (4ENO) effort over the period of fiscal year 2020 to fiscal year 2024. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not later than February 1, 2021, on the status of the consolidation effort, including details on the schedule and plan for consolidation, progress on the transition of each Defense Agency and Field Activity (DAFA) from common use information technology services into the SSP environment, the list of assets and services being transitioned, a list of assets and services remaining within each DAFA, a justification for assets not transitioned, and the reallocation of funding as a result of the transition.
  • GAO Assessment on DOD Cyber Incident Management Efforts
    • The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) has experienced a number of high-profile breaches to Department of Defense (DOD) systems and networks. For example, in July 2015, a phishing attack on the Joint Chiefs of Staff unclassified email servers resulted in the system being shut down for more than a week while cyber experts rebuilt the network, affecting the work of roughly 4,000 military and civilian personnel. In 2018, DOD disclosed a data breach to its contracted travel management system that allegedly affected approximately 30,000 military and civilian employees. In 2020, DOD similarly acknowledged that the Defense Information Systems Agency networks were breached that reportedly resulted in the personal data of approximately 200,000 network users being compromised.
    • The committee is concerned that while DOD established the Joint Force Headquarters–DOD Information Network (JFHQ– DODIN) to operationalize and defend DOD systems and networks, other DOD components still view these systems and networks as an administrative capability. Cyber incidents, such as those identified above, can disrupt critical military operations, lead to inappropriate access to and modification of sensitive information, result in long-term financial obligations for credit monitoring, and threaten national security. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide the congressional defense committees with an assessment of DOD management of cyber incidents and efforts to mitigate future cyber incidents.
  • GAO Study and Report on Electronic Continuity of Operations on the Department of Defense
    • The committee notes the centrality of electronic command, control, and communications to Department of Defense continuity of operations. To ensure that the committee is fully informed of how the Department of Defense is addressing issues related to the risk to electronic communications, the committee requests that the Comptroller General of the United States conduct a study of electronic communications continuity of operations of the Department of Defense.
  • Information Technology Asset Management and Inventory
    • The committee commends the Department of Defense for the considerable improvement made on information technology, asset discovery, and asset management. However, the committee believes the Department would benefit from an established process for auditing software and hardware inventories. The lack of a single policy framework hinders the capacity of the Department to discover license duplication and the Department is at risk of wasting valuable resources on redundant or underutilized hardware and software. The Department also lacks real-time discovery of and visibility over its network attack surface, particularly its forward-facing internet assets and Department assets held in cloud environments, resulting in increased risk of exposures exploitable by malicious adversaries. The private sector has successfully navigated this challenge through the use of automated software tools widely available on the commercial market.
    • The committee directs the Chief Information Officer of the Department of Defense, in coordination with chief information officers of the military services, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2021, on the processes in place for asset discovery and management of hardware and software products.
  • Internet Architecture Security
    • The committee recognizes that the internet is inextricable and central to the American way of life, and the architecture that enables internet communications is layered, complex, and multi-faceted. The committee notes that this architecture includes high-capacity cables laid underground and underseas, cable landing stations that connect cables from continent to continent, and internet exchange points that serve as clearinghouses for data between Internet Service Providers and content delivery networks; all of which are required for the internet to operate. The committee recognizes that the executive branch has assigned responsibility for components or sectors of critical infrastructure to various executive branch departments and agencies, and internet architecture is approached in a fractured and piecemeal fashion, with multiple government stakeholder entities claiming responsibility. The committee is concerned that the lack of direction on the subject of internet architecture security creates significant risks to the nation. Consequently, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2021, to examine the issue of internet architecture security.
  • Report and GAO Briefing on DOD Cyber Hygiene and Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification Framework
    • Given the importance of implementing cyber hygiene practices that could effectively protect DOD missions, information, and systems and networks, we direct the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the defense committees identifying the extent to which each of the DOD components have implemented cyber hygiene practices and levels identified in the CMMC framework. For each DOD component that does not achieve level 3 status (referred to as ‘‘good cyber hygiene’’ in CMMC Model ver. 1.02), the head of the component is to provide the Congressional defense committees, the DOD Chief Information Officer, the commander of JFHQ–DODIN a plan on how the component will implement those security measures within one year and mitigate potential consequences until those practices are implemented. In order to aid in the under-standing of what cyber hygiene practices have been and have not been implemented by the DOD that the department requires private sector companies to implement before they receive a contract where they would have access to controlled unclassified information, the Secretary of Defense shall submit the DOD report to the Congressional defense committees and the Comptroller General of the United States by March 1, 2021. The committee further directs the Comptroller General to conduct an independent review of the Secretary’s report and provide a briefing to the Congressional defense committees no later than the end of the fiscal year.
  • Department of Defense Artificial Intelligence Capabilities and Strategy
    • The committee believes that global leadership in artificial intelligence (AI) technology is a national security priority. In 2018, the Department of Defense issued a department-wide AI strategy to provide direction for AI development. As the Department increases its investments in AI, machine learning, and other automation technologies, the committee believes that the Department’s re-sources, capabilities, and plans should continue to ensure U.S. competitive advantage over potential adversaries. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide the committee with an assessment of the Department’s resources, capabilities, and plans for AI.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

House Hearing On CSC Recommendations

On the same day another committee was considering amendments to the FY 2021 NDAA, a committee looked at recommendations to change US cyber policy

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

One of the committees with jurisdiction over a number of the recommendations made by the Cyberspace Solarium Commission (CSC) held a virtual hearing to examine some of the panel’s policy and statutory suggestions to improve the cybersecurity of the United States. The hearing was chaired by one of the CSC members and all four witnesses were on the CSC. Those facts taken together with the timing of the hearing (i.e. right before the House is set to amendments embodying the CSC recommendations to the “William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (H.R.6395)) suggested the audience is House Democratic leadership, Senate Republican leadership, the Senate Armed Services Committee, and other stakeholders.

The House Homeland Security Committee’s Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, & Innovation Subcommittee held a virtual hearing on 17 July titled “Cyberspace Solarium Commission Recommendations” with the following witnesses:

  • Senator Angus King (I-ME), Co-Chair, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
  • Representative Michael Gallagher (R-WI), Co-Chair, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
  • Hon. Suzanne Spaulding, Commissioner, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
  • Ms. Samantha Ravich, Ph.D., Commissioner, Cyberspace Solarium Commission

Consequently, given the subcommittee’s jurisdiction over the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), and the latter’s responsibility for helping non-defense civilian agencies secure their networks and systems, the subcommittee spent a fair amount of time discussing how to improve both entities.

Representative James Langevin (D-RI) chaired the hearing even though Representative Cedric Richmond (D-LA) is chair of the subcommittee. As mentioned, Langevin served on the CSC and has offered a number of amendments to be debated when the House considers the FY 2021 NDAA this week. In his opening statement, Langevin asserted

  • The realities of 2020 make clear that a comprehensive, whole-of-nation approach to cybersecurity is a necessity, but we do not yet have one. We lack a clear leader in the White House whose mission it is to focus on cybersecurity. We lack clear understanding of roles and responsibilities, both within government and between government and the private sector. We lack clear metrics to measure our progress.
  • The Cyberspace Solarium Commission report cannot fix all the challenges we have in cyberspace. But it does chart a bold course, and it does not shy away from the tradeoffs we will need to make to decisively improve our cybersecurity posture. The report makes clear that everyone – from government to private sector companies to Congress itself –needs to make meaningful changes.
  • We need to expect more from government: closer coordination across agencies, stronger collaboration with critical infrastructure, and, critically, a greater emphasis on planning. And we need to strengthen government agencies – in particular CISA – to do so.
  • We also need to expect more from the private sector. We need companies to truly accept the risks they take in cyberspace by accepting the consequences of failing to protect their data and networks.
  • We also need technology companies – what the report calls “cybersecurity enablers” – to do more to make the secure choice the default choice. Too often, we see a rush to be first to market, not secure to market. Too often, we see entities like ISPs not protecting their small and medium sized customers because they don’t believe it’s their job.
  • Most importantly, where the public and private intersect, at the nexus of critical infrastructure that this committee is charged with protecting, we need to ensure the private sector is doing its part to protect itself while acknowledging that they can’t go it alone.

Ranking Member John Katko (R-NY)

  • The recommendations I am most interested in hearing about today are, strengthening the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and its workforce, evaluating CISA’s facilities needs, strengthening the CISA Director position and making the Assistant Directors career, the National Cyber Director, authorizing CISA to threat hunt on the .gov domain, securing email, developing a strategy to secure email, and modernizing the digital infrastructure of state and local governments and small and mid-sized businesses.
  • As Ranking Member on the Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation Subcommittee, my top priority among the Commission’s recommendations is strengthening and clarifying the CISA’s authority and vastly increasing its funding to allow it to carry out its role as the Nation’s risk manager coordinating the protection of critical infrastructure and federal agencies and departments from cyber threats.  I introduced this recommendation as a bill, which requires CISA to assess what additional resources are necessary to fulfill its mission.  This assessment should examine CISA’s workforce composition and future demands and report to Congress on the findings.
  • Under the bill, CISA would also evaluate its current facilities and future needs including accommodating integration of personnel, critical infrastructure partners, and other department and agency personnel and make recommendations to the General Services Administration (GSA).  GSA must evaluate CISA’s recommendations and report to Congress within 30 days on how best to accommodate CISA’s mission and goals with commensurate facilities.  The facilities evaluation dovetails with the Commission’s recommendation for an integrated cyber center within CISA.
  • I reintroduced my bill elevating and strengthening the CISA Director position to reflect the significance of the role, making the position the equivalent of an Assistant Secretary or military service secretary.  My bill limits the term of the CISA Director to 2, 5-year terms, which ensures the agency has stable leadership. It also depoliticizes the Assistant Director positions by making them a career.
  • A related legislative proposal that I am working with colleagues to pass, clarifies CISA’s authority to conduct continuous threat hunting across the .gov domain.  This will increase CISA’s ability to protect federal networks and allow CISA to provide relevant threat information to critical infrastructure.
  • Finally, the recommendation to establish a National Cyber Director within the White House is another legislative proposal I am cosponsoring.  This Presidentially-nominated and Senate-confirmed National Cyber Director would be the principle cybersecurity advisor of the President, tasked with developing, counseling the President on, and supervising the implementation of a National Cyber Strategy. This leadership will bring focus to our Nation’s cybersecurity as a top strategic priority.

Committee Chair Bennie Thompson (D-MS) explained

  • Although there are many well-intentioned, capable people working hard to advance sound cybersecurity policy throughout the executive branch, the lack of consistent leadership from the White House has stunted progress. Over two years ago, for example, the White House green-lighted the elimination of its Cyber Security Coordinator. The result is a lack of effective coordination among Federal agencies who compete for cybersecurity authorities, responsibilities, and associated budgets – and Federal agencies approaching Congress with conflicting priorities. The time has come for that to stop.
  • Toward that end, I appreciate and support the Commission’s recommendation that Congress establish a National Cyber Director. I understand Congressman Langevin has authored legislation to implement that recommendation and has also submitted it as an amendment to the NDAA. I fully support both efforts.
  • I similarly appreciate the Commission’s recommendations regarding strengthening the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and more clearly defining the roles and responsibilities of CISA and sector risk management agencies. Right-sizing CISA’s budget and equipping it with the authorities necessary to carry out its mission to secure Federal networks, while also supporting critical infrastructure, has been a bipartisan priority of Committee Members.
  • I am particularly interested in hearing Ms. Spaulding’s thoughts on these recommendations given her perspective as the former Under Secretary of the National Protection and Programs Directorate.
  • Additionally, I am interested in discussing Commission recommendations related to implementing a “carrot and stick” approach to encourage private sector collaboration with the Federal government’s cybersecurity and defense efforts, particularly the proposed codification of “systemically important critical infrastructure.”
  • Finally, I would be remiss if I did not address the Commission’s observation that Congress’ fractured jurisdiction over cybersecurity frustrates efforts to achieve a comprehensive, cohesive approach to cybersecurity. I agree. And while I disagree with the Commission’s recommendation on that point, rest assured that I am working to address the underlying problem.

In a joint statement, CSC Members

  • Ultimately, the Commission developed a strategic approach of “layered cyber deterrence” with the objectives of actively shaping behavior in cyberspace, denying benefits to adversaries who exploit this domain, and imposing real costs against those who target America’s economic and democratic institutions in and through cyberspace. Our critical infrastructure–the systems, assets, and entities that underpin our national security, economic security, and public health and safety—are increasingly threatened by malicious cyber actors. Effective critical infrastructure security and resilience requires reducing the consequences of disruption, minimizing vulnerability, and disrupting adversary operations that seek to hold our assets at risk. We believe the future of the U.S. economy and our national security requires both the executive branch and Congress work in tandem to prioritize and grant the following recommendations.
    • First and foremost, the Commission found that the federal government lacks consistent and institutionalized leadership, as well as a cohesive, clear strategic vision on cybersecurity. As a result, we recommend that Congress establish a National Cyber Director in the Executive Office of the President to centralize and coordinate the cybersecurity mission at the national level. The National Cyber Director would work with federal departments and agencies to bring coherence in the development of cybersecurity policy and strategy and in its execution. The position would provide clear leadership in the White House and signal cybersecurity as an enduring priority in U.S. national security strategy.
    • Second, the government must continue to improve the resourcing, authorities, and organization of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) in its role as the primary federal agency responsible for critical infrastructure protection, security, and resilience. We recommend empowering CISA with tools to strengthen public-private partnership. Of particular value would be the authorities needed to aid in responding to attempted attacks on critical infrastructure from a variety of actors ranging from nation-states to criminals. Currently, the U.S. government’s authorities are limited exclusively to certain criminal contexts, where evidence of a compromise exists, and do not address instances in which critical infrastructure systems are vulnerable to a cyberattack. To address this gap, Congress should grant CISA subpoena authority in support of their threat and asset response activities, while ensuring appropriate liability protections for cooperating private-sector network owners.
    • Third, elements of the U.S. government and the private sector often lack the tools necessary for successful collaboration to counter and mitigate a malicious nation-state cyber campaign. To address this shortcoming, the executive branch should establish a Joint Cyber Planning Office under CISA to coordinate cybersecurity planning and readiness across the federal government and between the public and private sectors for significant cyber incidents and malicious cyber campaigns. Within a similar vein, Congress should also direct the U.S. government to plan and execute a national-level cyber table-top exercise on a biennial basis that involves senior leaders from the executive branch, Congress, state governments, and the private sector, as well as international partners, to build muscle memory for key decision makers and develop new solutions and strengthen our collective defense.
    • Fourth, the United States must take immediate steps to ensure our critical infrastructure sectors can withstand and quickly respond to and recover from a significant cyber incident. Resilience against such attacks is critical in reducing benefits that our adversaries can expect from their operations–whether disruption, intellectual property theft, or espionage. Congress should direct the executive branch to develop a Continuity of the Economy Plan. This plan should include the federal government, SLTT entities and private stakeholders who can collectively identify the resources and authorities needed to rapidly restart our economy after a major disruption. In addition, the Commission recommends establishing a Cyber State of Distress tied to a Cyber Response and Recovery Fund , giving the government greater flexibility to scale up and augment its own capacity to aid the private sector when a significant cyber incident occurs. These changes will ensure the infrastructure that supports our most critical national functions can continue to operate amidst disruption or crisis.
    • Fifth, the Commission recommends two relevant initiatives to reshape the cyber ecosystem toward greater security for all Americans. The first, the creation of a National Cybersecurity Certification and Labeling Authority, would help create standards and transparency that will allow consumers of technology products and services to use the power of their purses over time to demand more security and less vulnerability in the technologies they buy. Furthermore, Congress should appropriate funds to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in partnership with the Department of Energy, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), and the Department of Defense (DoD), to competitively select, designate, and fund up to three Critical Technology Security Centers in order to centralize efforts directed towards evaluating and testing security of devices and technologies that underpin our networks and critical infrastructure.
    • Sixth, the U.S. Intelligence Community is not currently resourced or aligned to adequately support the private sector in cyber defense and security. While the intelligence community is formidable in informing security operations in instances when the U.S. government is the defender, its policies and procedures are not aligned to intelligence collection on behalf of private entities, which constitutes around 85% of our critical infrastructure. To that end, Congress should direct the executive branch to conduct a six-month comprehensive review of intelligence policies, procedures, and resources to identify and address key limitations in order to improve the intelligence community’s ability to provide intelligence support to the private sector.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo by ThisIsEngineering from Pexels

Federal Software Hearing

Through the prism of the US’ inadequate response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a House committee chewed over familiar issues plaguing the US’ government’s technology use and modernization efforts.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

On 15 July, the House Budget Committee held a virtual hearing titled “Software Update Required: COVID-19 Exposes Need for Federal Investments in Technology” to highlight the effects of underfunding of technology programs in the federal government has had in hindering efforts to combat COVID-19 and measures to mitigate its impacts. The shortcomings of federal information technology (IT) procurements, processes, and performance is one of the areas where there is bipartisan agreement on many of the issues and proposed solutions. However, Republicans and Democrats often differ on funding for civilian IT programs, a feature of the ongoing debate about another COVID-19 stimulus package. And this was the line that divided the chair and ranking member of the committee on how to address acknowledged failures in how federal and state governments distributed aid to people and businesses. Because the House Budget Committee does not have direct jurisdiction over technology programs other than setting broad parameters in the years it drafts and passes a budget resolution to guide Congressional funding, the impact of this hearing is more in the vein of shaping discussion in the House on how it should address the funding and governance of IT programs, which. Now total more than $90 billion annually of the more than $1.2 trillion in funds Congress doles out every year.

Chair John Yarmuth (D-KY) claimed “[r]ash funding cuts over the past decade have prevented the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) from modernizing its information technology (IT) systems, deteriorating the agency’s ability to not only carry out its core function of tax collection and enforcement, but also needlessly prolonging the delivery of stimulus payments to workers and families during the coronavirus pandemic and recession.” He asserted that “[t]he coronavirus pandemic has proved that the quicker the response the better the outcome – and that the steps taken by Congress to help American workers and families are only as effective as the agencies delivering that relief.” Yarmuth claimed “[u]nfortunately, the IRS is not alone in its inability to meet the needs of the American people in this perilous time.”

Yarmuth stated

  • Instead of helping to generate much-needed solutions, outdated IT systems are worsening an already difficult situation as Americans grapple with unreliable or insufficient internet access, useless automated systems, and overwhelmed and underprepared agencies. Emergency assistance programs across the board have been hampered by our antiquated IT systems – leaving families with delayed relief or no relief at all.
  • The most glaring example is unemployment assistance. We are four months into the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, and there are still tens of thousands of workers who have filed for jobless claims but have not yet received a single payment. Many are going into debt or default, skipping meals, or losing their homes.
  • State unemployment offices, already underfunded and understaffed, were left completely unprepared for the massive influx of need. And a big reason for that is the fact that national administrative funding is essentially the same as it was in 2001 – and that’s before accounting for inflation.

Yarmuth continued

  • This lack of federal investment combined with old hardware, crashing web servers, and the need for new-hires proficient in COBOL – their systems’ 60-year old coding language – have left states scrambling. Their antiquated IT systems failed and continue to fail repeatedly – and American workers, those who lost their jobs through no fault of their own, are paying the price.
  • This aspect of our ongoing crisis is not new. The federal government has long sought to prioritize modern, secure, and shared IT solutions, but funding uncertainties – stemming from constrained discretionary funding under budget caps, shutdown threats, and continuing resolutions – have made agencies more likely to update instead of modernize. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports that while the total share of federal IT spending is increasing, it isn’t because we are investing in better and new technology. It’s because the price of updating our existing systems is snowballing as our ancient software becomes increasingly outdated and hardware parts nearly impossible to find.

Yarmuth said “[t]o date, Congress has passed legislation that includes $1 billion in grants to state unemployment offices to help process claims faster – and more is needed.” He argued that “[b]y refusing to bring the “HEROES Act” (H.R.6800) to the floor, [Senate Majority] Leader [Mitch] McConnell (R-KY) is holding up an additional $1 billion for the federal Technology Modernization Fund and a combined $5.5 billion to help schools, libraries, and impacted families access high speed connectivity and devices to facilitate distance learning – something we must prioritize in order to protect our children and educators.” Yarmuth remarked “earlier this month, House Democrats passed the “Moving Forward Act,” (H.R.2) a comprehensive infrastructure package that includes $100 billion in broadband funding to extend high speed internet to underserved and hard to reach communities.” He declared that “[w]e have to invest in modernization now, so that the federal government can help provide workers, families, and state and local governments with the necessary tools and resources to support our nation’s recovery efforts.”

Ranking Member Steve Womack (R-AR) said “[f]ederal information technology (IT) systems are critical to providing Americans with a wide range of government services and information…[and] [i]n the 21st century, it’s no secret that IT is fundamental to many different operations.” He contended “[t]hese systems are aimed at improving program delivery, maximizing effectiveness and efficiency, and ensuring data security…[and] [i]f we cannot maintain and optimize this critical infrastructure, the federal government will be unable to execute one of its essential functions: providing crucial resources and services to the American people.” Womack asserted “[w]e should never allow the delivery of veteran health care, social security benefits, or defense initiatives to fail because of outdated and faulty IT systems.”

Womack stated that “[u]nfortunately, current federal IT upgrade efforts are faltering due to missed deadlines, cost overruns, and inadequate outcomes, including operability failure and data breaches…[and] [w]hile COVID-19 exposed additional deficiencies of federal IT systems, these shortages existed long before the current pandemic.”

Womack stated

  • For example, in 2011, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) began an electronic health record (EHR) modernization initiative to create a single, shared system between the two departments. In 2013, and after spending more than $1 billion on the program, the VA and DOD announced they were abandoning the project with nothing to show for the money spent other than a painful lesson learned. This is not only a waste of taxpayer dollars, but, more disconcerting, it hurts our nation’s service members and veterans who depend on these health care services. This is the more upsetting part for me. Program indecision and mismanagement have resulted in us failing those who’ve served this country.
  • Where is this EHR effort at the VA today? The VA and DOD are trying this again with a new government contract from Cerner. This initiative is already nearly one year behind schedule and has yet to go live in even one medical center. I truly hope this story ends better than past VA efforts in the IT space.

Womack added “I’m not just picking on the VA’s challenges. There are other examples of how we have fallen short:

  • In 2014, the Office of Personnel Management’s data was breached, which resulted in approximately 21.5 million compromised records.
  • The HITECH Act, which was part of the 2009 stimulus package, allocated billions of dollars for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for IT development. To date, HHS still does not have an interoperable system and continues to struggle with siloed and fragmented data due to the different electronic health records vendors.”

Womack claimed “the question is, how do we make sure, going forward, all federal investments in IT modernization efforts result in the timely deployment of up-to-date, secure, and properly functioning systems?”

Womack asserted

  • Strong vetting and planning for proper IT implementation is key. It is imperative that these investments are met with rigorous oversight—yes, that is our job here in Congress—and agency accountability to ensure that the public is getting the best services available and taxpayer dollars are not wasted.
  • But, as I mentioned last week, there is another threat to federal investments in vital government programs such as IT modernization. That is our out-of-control deficit and debt. If we don’t confront the autopilot mandatory spending that is hurtling us towards a fiscal cliff, there won’t be any money left to fund a range of prerogatives.
  • Time is running out, and it’s essential that Congress directly address this problem. The Budget Committee must meet its duty and put together a budget to chart a new way forward. We need to get back to making the tough choices that will determine a brighter future. We have an obligation to current and future generations to ensure that critical programs don’t cease to exist.

National Academy of Public Administration President and CEO Teresa Gerton stated

  • The government’s IT infrastructure is heavily dependent upon technologies that were invented in the mid-twentieth century. The coronavirus pandemic has made it abundantly clear that those systems pose extraordinary risk to government operations in a steady state environment, and they may fail catastrophically in a crisis. And yet, government budgeting rules and appropriation law have created IT acquisition challenges for almost as long as the term “IT” has existed.
  • Insufficient funding for capital improvements has forced agencies to repeat a cycle in which robust plans submitted with their budget requests have to be scaled back to align with the reduced funding amounts they eventually receive. Insufficient funding leads to implementation of sub-optimal solutions with limited impact on improving efficiency. Ironically, governments bear an extra cost burden for such strategies because they must allocate expensive resources to maintain obsolete and inefficient solutions, which by any reasonable business standard should have been rationalized and replaced.
  • To really change the future, we must change the rules. Today the government has challenges with cloud procurement, but the market is constantly evolving. More things will be sold as a service in the future. With enablers like quantum computing and machine learning, technology innovation will inevitably continue at an increasing rate. Given the economic, demographic, and social challenges facing this nation, the federal government must find new ways to invest in and to improve its effectiveness and efficiency to successfully meet the current and future demands of the American public. We must provide acquisition and sustainment flexibility that reflects what the commercial market is selling, and we must adapt our accounting and auditing rules to encourage, not discourage, the use of these flexibilities. We must be ready to effectively acquire and deploy modern technology solutions or risk failures in our support to our citizens, and potentially calamitous failures in our ability to govern.

Code for America Founder and U.S. Digital Response Co-Founder Jennifer Pahlka said “[t]o get government tech right, we of course need to be able to procure more modern technology platforms…[b]ut that will be insufficient if we don’t also do three things that support ​agility and human-centered design:

  • The first is to break down the silos between policy, technology and other disciplines. Technology can’t speed a process in which most cases must be handled manually, as I described above in the case of unemployment benefits under the CARES Act. A similar problem is that many states require applicants for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) to apply for regular unemployment first, wait to receive their rejection, and only then apply for PUA. Tech, operations, policy and compliance staff must work together to solve these problems, and agile development models allow for this collaboration in ways that legacy models do not. We must even have digital professionals at the table when we craft policy; understanding how the service will be delivered is critical to getting the outcomes the policy seeks, especially now, as we face greater and greater needs and limited delivery capabilities. As the former head of the White House Domestic Policy Council Cecilia Muñoz has said, “Policy leaders must learn the skills of human-centered design, and technology must have a seat at the strategy table.”
  • The second is to encourage rapid prototyping and continuous development. Our legacy process involves a requirements gathering period that can take many years, followed by the development of a Request for Proposal that can be thousands of pages long, lengthy contracting and development periods, and then a move into what’s called sustainment. This process may work for constructing buildings, but it’s simply not how good software comes to life. It is better, faster and cheaper when interdisciplinary teams start small, build iteratively, work closely with the users of the software all the way through, and continuously update and improve the application.
  • The third is to demand that all services provide real-time data about their usage and that human beings are assigned to looking at that data to understand what’s working, what’s not working and what can be done about it. When Code for America started working to decrease the participation gap in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance (SNAP) in California, our team found that the program leadership had very little insight into the reasons people tried to apply and couldn’t, or applied but couldn’t make it through the burdensome process despite being eligible. It wasn’t that they didn’t care; the systems they’d been given to manage eligibility and enrollment simply didn’t provide that data, and what data they did get was usually months, if not years, old by the time they got it. Creating an online application that was simpler and easier to use had huge benefits for the people applying, but an equally important benefit was that the system was instrumented to allow decision-makers to see in near real-time where users got stuck and begin to fix those issues. This access to real-time data is part of what’s needed as we deal with today’s crisis.

National Employment Law Project Executive Director Rebecca Dixon urged “Congress to immediately take the following steps, which will help stabilize and ensure greater accountability and transparency over the state IT systems:

1. Fully Fund the States Linked to Strong Accountability Standards: Most importantly, the federal government must make a sizable commitment to provide dedicated funding of IT modernization and far more adequate levels of basic state unemployment insurance (UI) administration funding. With the additional funding should come strong federal oversight and enforcement, including tangible requirements that the modernization process include input from stakeholders (including workers and their advocates) from beginning to end, and comprehensive user testing that ensures participation from Black people who are faced with the most barriers, and all communities of color; those on the other side of the digital divide; people with limited English proficiency; and people with disabilities.

2. Expand the Department of Labor’s (DOL) IT Expertise and Mandate to Ensure Full Access: There is extremely limited independent capacity and IT expertise on the part of DOL to actively monitor and enforce the state UI systems. DOL should create a specialized unit devoted to the IT, phone and other state UI agency infrastructure needs. DOL’s new regime should include strong measures of state success and failure (including adequate customer service) that can be assigned a grade that should be prominently featured on the DOL website to provide transparency to the public and compare the operation of programs across the states. For example, DOL should extend the timeliness regulations to ensure that workers are able to successfully reach a claims agent by phone within a reasonable period of time. In addition, DOL’s Center for Civil Rights should also be fully resourced to more promptly investigate and respond to complaints and make the results of their investigations public. DOL should also have the authority to review IT contractor agreements, audit contractors where necessary, and require the states to produce data documenting contractor performance.

3. Federal Commission on Modernization of Federally Funded Benefit Programs: A federal task force should be immediately created to evaluate the performance of federally funded programs, including UI, and make recommendations for reform related to funding, the creation of robust standards and metrics, contractor accountability, best practices, and the adequacy of federal agency oversight and enforcement, including compliance with civil rights laws. The task force should also explore whether certain administrative and infrastructure functions (especially in response to disasters and public health emergencies) should be federalized, and whether federal agencies should have the authority to negotiate favorable terms with IT and phone system vendors that take advantage of the federal government’s ability to leverage cost savings while also producing more compatible and high-quality state systems. Federalization in whole or part may be the simplest solution. The patchwork of state systems means that each state has to struggle with the modernization process and vendor negotiations. While some states have banded together into consortia to get a better deal, those consortia can dissolve as political leadership shifts in allied states or as states develop different modernization goals, wasting time and money. A federal process could achieve these goals on the largest possible scale.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

Further Reading and Other Developments (17 July)

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

Speaking of which, the Technology Policy Update is being published daily during the week, and here are the Other Developments and Further Reading from this week.

Other Developments

  • Acting Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Marco Rubio (R-FL), Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chair Jim Risch (R-ID), and Senators Chris Coons (D-DE) and John Cornyn (R-TX) wrote Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and Secretary of Defense Mike Esper “to ask that the Administration take immediate measures to bring the most advanced digital semiconductor manufacturing capabilities to the United States…[which] are critical to our American economic and national security and while our nation leads in the design of semiconductors, we rely on international manufacturing for advanced semiconductor fabrication.” This letter follows the Trump Administration’s May announcement that the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation (TSMC) agreed to build a $12 billion plant in Arizona. It also bears note that one of the amendments pending to the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021“ (S.4049) would establish a grants program to stimulate semiconductor manufacturing in the US.
  • Senators Mark R. Warner (D-VA), Mazie K. Hirono (D-HI) and Bob Menendez (D-NJ) sent a letter to Facebook “regarding its failure to prevent the propagation of white supremacist groups online and its role in providing such groups with the organizational infrastructure and reach needed to expand.” They also “criticized Facebook for being unable or unwilling to enforce its own Community Standards and purge white supremacist and other violent extremist content from the site” and posed “a series of questions regarding Facebook’s policies and procedures against hate speech, violence, white supremacy and the amplification of extremist content.”
  • The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) published the Pipeline Cyber Risk Mitigation Infographic that was “[d]eveloped in coordination with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA)…[that] outlines activities that pipeline owners/operators can undertake to improve their ability to prepare for, respond to, and mitigate against malicious cyber threats.”
  • Representative Kendra Horn (D-OK) and 10 other Democrats introduced legislation “requiring the U.S. government to identify, analyze, and combat efforts by the Chinese government to exploit the COVID-19 pandemic” that was endorsed by “[t]he broader Blue Dog Coalition” according to their press release. The “Preventing China from Exploiting COVID-19 Act” (H.R.7484) “requires the Director of National Intelligence—in coordination with the Secretaries of Defense, State, and Homeland Security—to prepare an assessment of the different ways in which the Chinese government has exploited or could exploit the pandemic, which originated in China, in order to advance China’s interests and to undermine the interests of the United States, its allies, and the rules-based international order.” Horn and her cosponsors stated “[t]he assessment must be provided to Congress within 90 days and posted in unclassified form on the DNI’s website.”
  • The Supreme Court of Canada upheld the “Genetic Non-Discrimination Act” and denied a challenge to the legality of the statute brought by the government of Quebec, the Attorney General of Canada, and others. The court found:
    • The pith and substance of the challenged provisions is to protect individuals’ control over their detailed personal information disclosed by genetic tests, in the broad areas of contracting and the provision of goods and services, in order to address Canadians’ fears that their genetic test results will be used against them and to prevent discrimination based on that information. This matter is properly classified within Parliament’s power over criminal law. The provisions are supported by a criminal law purpose because they respond to a threat of harm to several overlapping public interests traditionally protected by the criminal law — autonomy, privacy, equality and public health.
  • The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission published a report “analyzing the evolution of U.S. multinational enterprises (MNE) operations in China from 2000 to 2017.” The Commission found MNE’s operations in the People’s Republic of China “may indirectly erode the  United  States’  domestic industrial competitiveness  and  technological  leadership relative  to  China” and “as U.S. MNE activity in China increasingly focuses on the production of high-end technologies, the risk  that  U.S.  firms  are  unwittingly enabling China to  achieve  its industrial  policy and  military  development objectives rises.”
  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Huawei filed their final briefs in their lawsuit before the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit arising from the FCC’s designation of Huawei as a “covered company” for purposes of a rule that denies Universal Service Funds (USF) “to purchase or obtain any equipment or services produced or provided by a covered company posing a national security threat to the integrity of communications networks or the communications supply chain.” Huawei claimed in its brief that “[t]he rulemaking and “initial designation” rest on the FCC’s national security judgments..[b]ut such judgments fall far afield of the FCC’s statutory  authority  and  competence.” Huawei also argued “[t]he USF rule, moreover, contravenes the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and the Due Process Clause.” The FCC responded in its filing that “Huawei challenges the FCC’s decision to exclude carriers whose networks are vulnerable to foreign interference, contending that the FCC has neither statutory nor constitutional authority to make policy judgments involving “national security”…[but] [t]hese arguments are premature, as Huawei has not yet been injured by the Order.” The FCC added “Huawei’s claim that the Communications Act textually commits all policy determinations with national security implications to the President is demonstrably false.”
  • European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) Wojciech Wiewiórowski released his Strategy for 2020-2024, “which will focus on Digital Solidarity.” Wiewiórowski explained that “three core pillars of the EDPS strategy outline the guiding actions and objectives for the organisation to the end of 2024:
    • Foresight: The EDPS will continue to monitor legal, social and technological advances around the world and engage with experts, specialists and data protection authorities to inform its work.
    • Action: To strengthen the EDPS’ supervision, enforcement and advisory roles the EDPS will promote coherence in the activities of enforcement bodies in the EU and develop tools to assist the EU institutions, bodies and agencies to maintain the highest standards in data protection.
    • Solidarity: While promoting digital justice and privacy for all, the EDPS will also enforce responsible and sustainable data processing, to positively impact individuals and maximise societal benefits in a just and fair way.
  • Facebook released a Civil Rights Audit, an “investigation into Facebook’s policies and practices began in 2018 at the behest and encouragement of the civil rights community and some members of Congress.” Those charged with conducting the audit explained that they “vigorously advocated for more and would have liked to see the company go further to address civil rights concerns in a host of areas that are described in detail in the report” including but not limited to
    • A stronger interpretation of its voter suppression policies — an interpretation that makes those policies effective against voter suppression and prohibits content like the Trump voting posts — and more robust and more consistent enforcement of those policies leading up to the US 2020 election.
    • More visible and consistent prioritization of civil rights in company decision-making overall.
    • More resources invested to study and address organized hate against Muslims, Jews and other targeted groups on the platform.
    • A commitment to go beyond banning explicit references to white separatism and white nationalism to also prohibit express praise, support and representation of white separatism and white nationalism even where the terms themselves are not used.
    • More concrete action and specific commitments to take steps to address concerns about algorithmic bias or discrimination.
    • They added that “[t]his report outlines a number of positive and consequential steps that the company has taken, but at this point in history, the Auditors are concerned that those gains could be obscured by the vexing and heartbreaking decisions Facebook has made that represent significant setbacks for civil rights.”
  • The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) released a white paper titled “The Role of AI Technology in Pandemic Response and Preparedness” that “outlines a series of investments and initiatives that the United States must undertake to realize the full potential of AI to secure our nation against pandemics.” NSCAI noted its previous two white papers:
  • Secretary of Defense Mark Esper announced that Chief Technology Officer Michael J.K. Kratsios has “been designated to serve as Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering” even though he does not have a degree in science. The last Under Secretary held a PhD. However, Kratsios worked for venture capitalist Peter Thiel who backed President Donald Trump when he ran for office in 2016.
  • The United States’ Department of Transportation’s Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) issued research “to develop a cyber security risk analysis methodology for communications-based connected railroad technologies…[and] [t]he use-case-specific implementation of the methodology can identify potential cyber attack threats, system vulnerabilities, and consequences of the attack– with risk assessment and identification of promising risk mitigation strategies.”
  • In a blog post, a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) economist asserted cybercrime may be having a much larger impact on the United States’ economy than previously thought:
    • In a recent NIST report, I looked at losses in the U.S. manufacturing industry due to cybercrime by examining an underutilized dataset from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which is the most statistically reliable data that I can find. I also extended this work to look at the losses in all U.S. industries. The data is from a 2005 survey of 36,000 businesses with 8,079 responses, which is also by far the largest sample that I could identify for examining aggregated U.S. cybercrime losses. Using this data, combined with methods for examining uncertainty in data, I extrapolated upper and lower bounds, putting 2016 U.S. manufacturing losses to be between 0.4% and 1.7% of manufacturing value-added or between $8.3 billion and $36.3 billion. The losses for all industries are between 0.9% and 4.1% of total U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), or between $167.9 billion and $770.0 billion. The lower bound is 40% higher than the widely cited, but largely unconfirmed, estimates from McAfee.
  • The Government Accountability Office (GAO) advised the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that it needs a comprehensive strategy for implementing 5G across the United States. The GAO concluded
    • FCC has taken a number of actions regarding 5G deployment, but it has not clearly developed specific and measurable performance goals and related measures–with the involvement of relevant stakeholders, including National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)–to manage the spectrum demands associated with 5G deployment. This makes FCC unable to demonstrate whether the progress being made in freeing up spectrum is achieving any specific goals, particularly as it relates to congested mid-band spectrum. Additionally, without having established specific and measurable performance goals with related strategies and measures for mitigating 5G’s potential effects on the digital divide, FCC will not be able to assess the extent to which its actions are addressing the digital divide or what actions would best help all Americans obtain access to wireless networks.
  • The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued “Time Guidance for Network Operators, Chief Information Officers, and Chief Information Security Officers” “to inform public and private sector organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies on time resilience and security practices in enterprise networks and systems…[and] to address gaps in available time testing practices, increasing awareness of time-related system issues and the linkage between time and cybersecurity.”
  • Fifteen Democratic Senators sent a letter to the Department of Defense, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI), and U.S. Cyber Command, urging them “to take additional measures to fight influence campaigns aimed at disenfranchising voters, especially voters of color, ahead of the 2020 election.” They called on these agencies to take “additional measures:”
    • The American people and political candidates are promptly informed about the targeting of our political processes by foreign malign actors, and that the public is provided regular periodic updates about such efforts leading up to the general election.
    • Members of Congress and congressional staff are appropriately and adequately briefed on continued findings and analysis involving election related foreign disinformation campaigns and the work of each agency and department to combat these campaigns.
    • Findings and analysis involving election related foreign disinformation campaigns are shared with civil society organizations and independent researchers to the maximum extent which is appropriate and permissible.
    • Secretary Esper and Director Ratcliffe implement a social media information sharing and analysis center (ISAC) to detect and counter information warfare campaigns across social media platforms as authorized by section 5323 of the Fiscal Year 2020 National Defense Authorization Act.
    • Director Ratcliffe implement the Foreign Malign Influence Response Center to coordinate a whole of government approach to combatting foreign malign influence campaigns as authorized by section 5322 of the Fiscal Year 2020 National Defense Authorization Act.
  • The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) unveiled an issue brief “Why New Calls to Subvert Commercial Encryption Are Unjustified” arguing “that government efforts to subvert encryption would negatively impact individuals and businesses.” ITIF offered these “key takeaways:”
    • Encryption gives individuals and organizations the means to protect the confidentiality of their data, but it has interfered with law enforcement’s ability to prevent and investigate crimes and foreign threats.
    • Technological advances have long frustrated some in the law enforcement community, giving rise to multiple efforts to subvert commercial use of encryption, from the Clipper Chip in the 1990s to the San Bernardino case two decades later.
    • Having failed in these prior attempts to circumvent encryption, some law enforcement officials are now calling on Congress to invoke a “nuclear option”: legislation banning “warrant-proof” encryption.
    • This represents an extreme and unjustified measure that would do little to take encryption out of the hands of bad actors, but it would make commercial products less secure for ordinary consumers and businesses and damage U.S. competitiveness.
  • The White House released an executive order in which President Donald Trump determined “that the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong (Hong Kong) is no longer sufficiently autonomous to justify differential treatment in relation to the People’s Republic of China (PRC or China) under the particular United States laws and provisions thereof set out in this order.” Trump further determined “the situation with respect to Hong Kong, including recent actions taken by the PRC to fundamentally undermine Hong Kong’s autonomy, constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat, which has its source in substantial part outside the United States, to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States…[and] I hereby declare a national emergency with respect to that threat.” The executive order would continue the Administration’s process of changing policy to ensure Hong Kong is treated the same as the PRC.
  • President Donald Trump also signed a bill passed in response to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) passing legislation the United States and other claim will strip Hong Kong of the protections the PRC agreed to maintain for 50 years after the United Kingdom (UK) handed over the city. The “Hong Kong Autonomy Act” “requires the imposition of sanctions on Chinese individuals and banks who are included in an annual State Department list found to be subverting Hong Kong’s autonomy” according to the bill’s sponsor Representative Brad Sherman (D-CA).
  • Representative Stephen Lynch, who chairs House Oversight and Reform Committee’s National Security Subcommittee, sent letters to Apple and Google “after the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) confirmed that mobile applications developed, operated, or owned by foreign entities, including China and Russia, could potentially pose a national security risk to American citizens and the United States” according to his press release. He noted in letters sent by the technology companies to the Subcommittee that:
    • Apple confirmed that it does not require developers to submit “information on where user data (if any such data is collected by the developer’s app) will be housed” and that it “does not decide what user data a third-party app can access, the user does.”
    • Google stated that it does “not require developers to provide the countries in which their mobile applications will house user data” and acknowledged that “some developers, especially those with a global user base, may store data in multiple countries.”
    • Lynch is seeking “commitments from Apple and Google to require information from application developers about where user data is stored, and to make users aware of that information prior to downloading the application on their mobile devices.”
  • Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison announced a settlement with Frontier Communications that “concludes the three major investigations and lawsuits that the Attorney General’s office launched into Minnesota’s major telecoms providers for deceptive, misleading, and fraudulent practices.” The Office of the Attorney General (OAG) stated
    • Based on its investigation, the Attorney General’s Office alleged that Frontier used a variety of deceptive and misleading practices to overcharge its customers, such as: billing customers more than they were quoted by Frontier’s agents; failing to disclose fees and surcharges in its sales presentations and advertising materials; and billing customers for services that were not delivered.
    • The OAG “also alleged that Frontier sold Minnesotans expensive internet services with so-called “maximum speed” ratings that were not attainable, and that Frontier improperly advertised its service as “reliable,” when in fact it did not provide enough bandwidth for customers to consistently receive their expected service.”
  • The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) issued guidelines “on the criteria of the Right to be Forgotten in the search engines cases under the GDPR” that “focuses solely on processing by search engine providers and delisting requests  submitted by data subjects” even Article 17 of the General Data Protection Regulation applies to all data controllers. The EDPB explained “This paper is divided into two topics:
    • The first topic concerns the grounds a data subject can rely on for a delisting request sent to a search engine provider pursuant to Article 17.1 GDPR.
    • The second topic concerns the exceptions to the Right to request delisting according to Article 17.3 GDPR.
  • The Australian Competition & Consumer Commission (ACCC) “is seeking views on draft Rules and accompanying draft Privacy Impact Assessment that authorise third parties who are accredited at the ‘unrestricted’ level to collect Consumer Data Right (CDR) data on behalf of another accredited person.” The ACCC explained “[t]his will allow accredited persons to utilise other accredited parties to collect CDR data and provide other services that facilitate the provision of goods and services to consumers.” In a March explanatory statement, the ACCC stated “[t]he CDR is an economy-wide reform that will apply sector-by-sector, starting with the banking sector…[and] [t]he objective of the CDR is to provide individual and business consumers (consumers) with the ability to efficiently and conveniently access specified data held about them by businesses (data holders), and to authorise the secure disclosure of that data to third parties (accredited data recipients) or to themselves.” The ACCC noted “[t]he CDR is regulated by both the ACCC and the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) as it concerns both competition and consumer matters as well as the privacy and confidentiality of consumer data.” Input is due by 20 July.
  • Office of the Inspector General (OIG) for the Department of the Interior (Interior) found that even though the agency spends $1.4 billion annually on cybersecurity “[g]uarding against increasing cybersecurity threats” remains one of Interior’s top challenges. The OIG asserted Interior “continues to struggle to implement an enterprise information technology (IT) security program that balances compliance, cost, and risk while enabling bureaus to meet their diverse missions.”
  • In a summary of its larger investigation into “Security over Information Technology Peripheral Devices at Select Office of Science Locations,” the Department of Energy’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) that “identified weaknesses related to access controls and configuration settings” for peripheral devices (e.g. thumb drives, printers, scanners and other connected devices)  “similar in type to those identified in prior evaluations of the Department’s unclassified cybersecurity program.”
  • The House Homeland Security Committee’s Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation Subcommittee Ranking Member John Katko (R-NY) “a comprehensive national cybersecurity improvement package” according to his press release, consisting of these bills:
    • The “Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Director and Assistant Directors Act:”  This bipartisan measure takes steps to improve guidance and long-term strategic planning by stabilizing the CISA Director and Assistant Directors positions. Specifically, the bill:
      • Creates a 5-year term for the CISA Director, with a limit of 2 terms. The term of office for the current Director begins on date the Director began to serve.
      • Elevates the Director to the equivalent of a Deputy Secretary and Military Service Secretaries.
      • Depoliticizes the Assistant Director positions, appointed by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), categorizing them as career public servants. 
    • The “Strengthening the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act of 2020:” This measure mandates a comprehensive review of CISA in an effort to strengthen its operations, improve coordination, and increase oversight of the agency. Specifically, the bill:
      • Requires CISA to review how additional appropriations could be used to support programs for national risk management, federal information systems management, and public-private cybersecurity and integration. It also requires a review of workforce structure and current facilities and projected needs. 
      • Mandates that CISA provides a report to the House and Senate Homeland Committees within 1-year of enactment. CISA must also provide a report and recommendations to GSA on facility needs. 
      • Requires GSA to provide a review to the Administration and House and Senate Committees on CISA facilities needs within 30-days of Congressional report. 
    • The “CISA Public-Private Talent Exchange Act:” This bill requires CISA to create a public-private workforce program to facilitate the exchange of ideas, strategies, and concepts between federal and private sector cybersecurity professionals. Specifically, the bill:
      • Establishes a public-private cyber exchange program allowing government and industry professionals to work in one another’s field.
      • Expands existing private outreach and partnership efforts. 
  • The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is ordering United States federal civilian agencies “to apply the July 2020 Security Update for Windows Servers running DNS (CVE-2020-1350), or the temporary registry-based workaround if patching is not possible within 24 hours.” CISA stated “[t]he software update addresses a significant vulnerability where a remote attacker could exploit it to take control of an affected system and run arbitrary code in the context of the Local System Account.” CISA Director Christopher Krebs explained “due to the wide prevalence of Windows Server in civilian Executive Branch agencies, I’ve determined that immediate action is necessary, and federal departments and agencies need to take this remote code execution vulnerability in Windows Server’s Domain Name System (DNS) particularly seriously.”
  • The United States (US) Department of State has imposed “visa restrictions on certain employees of Chinese technology companies that provide material support to regimes engaging in human rights abuses globally” that is aimed at Huawei. In its statement, the Department stated “Companies impacted by today’s action include Huawei, an arm of the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) surveillance state that censors political dissidents and enables mass internment camps in Xinjiang and the indentured servitude of its population shipped all over China.” The Department claimed “[c]ertain Huawei employees provide material support to the CCP regime that commits human rights abuses.”
  • Earlier in the month, the US Departments of State, Treasury, Commerce, and of Homeland Security issued an “advisory to highlight the harsh repression in Xinjiang.” The agencies explained
    • Businesses, individuals, and other persons, including but not limited to academic institutions, research service providers, and investors (hereafter “businesses and individuals”), that choose to operate in Xinjiang or engage with entities that use labor from Xinjiang elsewhere in China should be aware of reputational, economic, and, in certain instances, legal, risks associated with certain types of involvement with entities that engage in human rights abuses, which could include Withhold Release Orders (WROs), civil or criminal investigations, and export controls.
  • The United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), Canada’s Communications  Security Establishment (CSE), United States’ National Security Agency (NSA) and the United States’ Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security  Agency (CISA) issued a joint advisory on a Russian hacking organization’s efforts have “targeted various organisations involved in COVID-19 vaccine development in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, highly likely with the intention of stealing information and intellectual property relating to the development and testing of COVID-19 vaccines.” The agencies named APT29 (also known as ‘the Dukes’ or ‘Cozy Bear’), “a cyber espionage group, almost certainly part of the Russian intelligence services,” as the culprit behind “custom malware known as ‘WellMess’ and ‘WellMail.’”
    • This alert follows May advisories issued by Australia, the US, and the UK on hacking threats related to the pandemic. Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) issued “Advisory 2020-009: Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) actors targeting Australian health sector organisations and COVID-19 essential services” that asserted “APT groups may be seeking information and intellectual property relating to vaccine development, treatments, research and responses to the outbreak as this information is now of higher value and priority globally.” CISA and NCSC issued a joint advisory for the healthcare sector, especially companies and entities engaged in fighting COVID-19. The agencies stated that they have evidence that Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) groups “are exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic as part of their cyber operations.” In an unclassified public service announcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and CISA named the People’s Republic of China as a nation waging a cyber campaign against U.S. COVID-19 researchers. The agencies stated they “are issuing this announcement to raise awareness of the threat to COVID-19-related research.”
  • The National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) has released a draft National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) for comment due by 28 August. Draft NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-181 Revision 1, Workforce Framework for Cybersecurity (NICE Framework) that features several updates, including:
    • an updated title to be more inclusive of the variety of workers who perform cybersecurity work,
    • definition and normalization of key terms,
    • principles that facilitate agility, flexibility, interoperability, and modularity,
    • introduction of competencies,
  • Representatives Glenn Thompson (R-PA), Collin Peterson (D-MN), and James Comer (R-KY) sent a letter to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) “questioning the Commission’s April 20, 2020 Order granting Ligado’s application to deploy a terrestrial nationwide network to provide 5G services.”
  • The European Commission (EC) is asking for feedback on part of its recently released data strategy by 31 July. The EC stated it is aiming “to create a single market for data, where data from public bodies, business and citizens can be used safely and fairly for the common good…[and] [t]his initiative will draw up rules for common European data spaces (covering areas like the environment, energy and agriculture) to:
    • make better use of publicly held data for research for the common good
    • support voluntary data sharing by individuals
    • set up structures to enable key organisations to share data.
  • The United Kingdom’s Parliament is asking for feedback on its legislative proposal to regulate Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport explained “the obligations within the government’s proposed legislative framework would fall mainly on the manufacturer if they are based in the UK, or if not based in the UK, on their UK representative.” The Department is also “developing an enforcement approach with relevant stakeholders to identify an appropriate enforcement body to be granted day to day responsibility and operational control of monitoring compliance with the legislation.” The Department also touted the publishing of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute’s (ETSI) “security baseline for Internet-connected consumer devices and provides a basis for future Internet of Things product certification schemes.”
  • Facebook issued a white paper, titled “CHARTING A WAY FORWARD: Communicating Towards People-Centered and Accountable Design About Privacy,” in which the company states its desire to be involved in shaping a United States privacy law (See below for an article on this). Facebook concluded:
    • Facebook recognizes the responsibility we have to make sure that people are informed about the data that we collect, use, and share.
    • That’s why we support globally consistent comprehensive privacy laws and regulations that, among other things, establish people’s basic rights to be informed about how their information is collected, used, and shared, and impose obligations for organizations to do the same, including the obligation to build internal processes that maintain accountability.
    • As improvements to technology challenge historic approaches to effective communications with people about privacy, companies and regulators need to keep up with changing times.
    • To serve the needs of a global community, on both the platforms that exist now and those that are yet to be developed, we want to work with regulators, companies, and other interested third parties to develop new ways of informing people about their data, empowering them to make meaningful choices, and holding ourselves accountable.
    • While we don’t have all the answers, there are many opportunities for businesses and regulators to embrace modern design methods, new opportunities for better collaboration, and innovative ways to hold organizations accountable.
  • Four Democratic Senators sent Facebook a letter “about reports that Facebook has created fact-checking exemptions for people and organizations who spread disinformation about the climate crisis on its social media platform” following a New York Times article this week on the social media’s practices regarding climate disinformation. Even though the social media giant has moved aggressively to take down false and inaccurate COVID-19 posts, climate disinformation lives on the social media platform largely unmolested for a couple of reasons. First, Facebook marks these sorts of posts as opinion and take the approach that opinions should be judged under an absolutist free speech regime. Moreover, Facebook asserts posts of this sort do not pose any imminent harm and therefore do not need to be taken down. Despite having teams of fact checkers to vet posts of demonstrably untrue information, Facebook chooses not to, most likely because material that elicits strong reactions from users drive engagement that, in turn, drives advertising dollars. Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-WA), Tom Carper (D-DE), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) argued “[i]f Facebook is truly “committed to fighting the spread of false news on Facebook and Instagram,” the company must immediately acknowledge in its fact-checking process that the climate crisis is not a matter of opinion and act to close loopholes that allow climate disinformation to spread on its platform.” They posed a series of questions to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on these practices, requesting answers by 31 July.
  • A Canadian court has found that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) “admittedly collected information in a manner that is contrary to this foundational commitment and then relied on that information in applying for warrants under the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act, RSC 1985, c C-23 [CSIS Act]” according to a court summary of its redacted decision. The court further stated “[t]he Service and the Attorney General also admittedly failed to disclose to the Court the Service’s reliance on information that was likely collected unlawfully when seeking warrants, thereby breaching the duty of candour owed to the Court.” The court added “[t]his is not the first time this Court has been faced with a breach of candour involving the Service…[and] [t]he events underpinning this most recent breach were unfolding as recommendations were being implemented by the Service and the Attorney General to address previously identified candour concerns.” CSIS was found to have illegally collected and used metadata in a 2016 case ion its conduct between 2006-2016. In response to the most recent ruling, CSIS is vowing to implement a range of reforms. The National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) is pledging the same.
  • The United Kingdom’s National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) announced the withdrawal of “[t]he ‘Digital device extraction – information for complainants and witnesses’ form and ‘Digital Processing Notice’ (‘the relevant forms’) circulated to forces in February 2019 [that] are not sufficient for their intended purpose.” In mid-June, the UK’s data protection authority, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) unveiled its “finding that police data extraction practices vary across the country, with excessive amounts of personal data often being extracted, stored, and made available to others, without an appropriate basis in existing data protection law.” This withdrawal was also due, in part, to a late June Court of Appeal decision.  
  • A range of public interest and advocacy organizations sent a letter to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) noting “there are intense efforts underway to do exactly that, via current language in the House and Senate versions of the FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that ultimately seek to reverse the FCC’s recent bipartisan and unanimous approval of Ligado Networks’ regulatory plans.” They urged them “not endorse efforts by the Department of Defense and its allies to veto commercial spectrum authorizations…[and][t]he FCC has proven itself to be the expert agency on resolving spectrum disputes based on science and engineering and should be allowed to do the job Congress authorized it to do.” In late April, the FCC’s “decision authorize[d] Ligado to deploy a low-power terrestrial nationwide network in the 1526-1536 MHz, 1627.5-1637.5 MHz, and 1646.5-1656.5 MHz bands that will primarily support Internet of Things (IoT) services.” The agency argued the order “provides regulatory certainty to Ligado, ensures adjacent band operations, including Global Positioning System (GPS), are sufficiently protected from harmful interference, and promotes more efficient and effective use of [the U.S.’s] spectrum resources by making available additional spectrum for advanced wireless services, including 5G.”
  • The European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) rendered his opinion on the European Commission’s White Paper on Artificial Intelligence: a European approach to excellence and trust and recommended the following for the European Union’s (EU) regulation of artificial intelligence (AI):
    • applies both to EU Member States and to EU institutions, offices, bodies and agencies;
    • is designed to protect from any negative impact, not only on individuals, but also on communities and society as a whole;
    • proposes a more robust and nuanced risk classification scheme, ensuring any significant potential harm posed by AI applications is matched by appropriate mitigating measures;
    • includes an impact assessment clearly defining the regulatory gaps that it intends to fill.
    • avoids overlap of different supervisory authorities and includes a cooperation mechanism.
    • Regarding remote biometric identification, the EDPS supports the idea of a moratorium on the deployment, in the EU, of automated recognition in public spaces of human features, not only of faces but also of gait, fingerprints, DNA, voice, keystrokes and other biometric or behavioural signals, so that an informed and democratic debate can take place and until the moment when the EU and Member States have all the appropriate safeguards, including a comprehensive legal framework in place to guarantee the proportionality of the respective technologies and systems for the specific use case.
  • The Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz (BfV), Germany’s domestic security agency, released a summary of its annual report in which it claimed:
    • The Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Republic of Turkey remain the main countries engaged in espionage activities and trying to exert influence on Germany.
    • The ongoing digital transformation and the increasingly networked nature of our society increases the potential for cyber attacks, worsening the threat of cyber espionage and cyber sabotage.
    • The intelligence services of the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China in particular carry out cyber espionage activities against German agencies. One of their tasks is to boost their own economies with the help of information gathered by the intelligence services. This type of information-gathering campaign severely threatens the success and development opportunities of German companies.
    • To counteract this threat, Germany has a comprehensive cyber security architecture in place, which is operated by a number of different authorities. The BfV plays a major role in investigating and defending against cyber threats by detecting attacks, attributing them to specific attackers, and using the knowledge gained from this to draw up prevention strategies. The National Cyber Response Centre, in which the BfV plays a key role, was set up to consolidate the co-operation between the competent agencies. The National Cyber Response Centre aims to optimise the exchange of information between state agencies and to improve the co-ordination of protective and defensive measures against potential IT incidents.

Further Reading

  • Trump confirms cyberattack on Russian trolls to deter them during 2018 midterms” – The Washington Post. In an interview with former George W. Bush speechwriter Marc Thiessen, President Donald Trump confirmed he ordered a widely reported retaliatory attack on the Russian Federation’s Internet Research Agency as a means of preventing interference during the 2018 mid-term election. Trump claimed this attack he ordered was the first action the United States took against Russian hacking even though his predecessor warned Russian President Vladimir Putin to stop such activities and imposed sanctions at the end of 2016. The timing of Trump’s revelation is interesting given the ongoing furor over reports of Russian bounties paid to Taliban fighters for killing Americans the Trump Administration may have known of but did little or nothing to stop.
  • Germany proposes first-ever use of EU cyber sanctions over Russia hacking” – Deutsche Welle. Germany is looking to use the European Union’s (EU) cyber sanctions powers against Russia for its alleged 2015 16 GB exfiltration of data from the Bundestag’s systems, including from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s office. Germany has been alleging that Fancy Bear (aka APT28) and Russia’s military secret service GRU carried out the attack. Germany has circulated its case for sanctions to other EU nations and EU leadership. In 2017, the European Council declared “[t]he EU diplomatic response to malicious cyber activities will make full use of measures within the Common Foreign and Security Policy, including, if necessary, restrictive measures…[and] [a] joint EU response to malicious cyber activities would be proportionate to the scope, scale, duration, intensity, complexity, sophistication and impact of the cyber activity.”
  • Wyden Plans Law to Stop Cops From Buying Data That Would Need a Warrant” – VICE. Following on a number of reports that federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies are essentially sidestepping the Fourth Amendment through buying location and other data from people’s smartphones, Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) is going to draft legislation that would seemingly close what he, and other civil libertarians, are calling a loophole to the warrant requirement.
  • Amazon Backtracks From Demand That Employees Delete TikTok” – The New York Times. Amazon first instructed its employees to remove ByteDance’s app, TikTok, on 11 July from company devices and then reversed course the same day, claiming the email had been erroneously sent out. The strange episode capped another tumultuous week for ByteDance as the Trump Administration is intensifying pressure in a number of ways on the company which officials claim is subject to the laws of the People’s Republic of China and hence must share information with the government in Beijing. ByteDance counters the app marketed in the United States is through a subsidiary not subject to PRC law. ByteDance also said it would no longer offer the app in Hong Kong after the PRC change in law has extended the PRC’s reach into the former British colony. TikTok was also recently banned in India as part of a larger struggle between India and he PRC. Additionally, the Democratic National Committee warned staff about using the app this week, too.
  • Is it time to delete TikTok? A guide to the rumors and the real privacy risks.” – The Washington Post. A columnist and security specialist found ByteDance’s app vacuums up information from users, but so does Facebook and other similar apps. They scrutinized TikTok’s privacy policy and where the data went, and they could not say with certainty that it goes to and stays on servers in the US and Singapore. 
  • California investigating Google for potential antitrust violations” – Politico. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra is going to conduct his own investigation of Google aside and apart from the investigation of the company’s advertising practices being conducted by virtually every other state in the United States. It was unclear why Becerra opted against joining the larger probe launched in September 2019. Of course, the Trump Administration’s Department of Justice is also investigating Google and could file suit as early as this month.
  • How May Google Fight an Antitrust Case? Look at This Little-Noticed Paper” – The New York Times. In a filing with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), Google claimed it does not control the online advertising market and it is borne out by a number of indicia that argue against a monopolistic situation. The company is likely to make the same case to the United States’ government in its antitrust inquiry. However, similar arguments did not gain tractions before the European Commission, which levied a €1.49 billion for “breaching EU antitrust rules” in March 2019.
  •  “Who Gets the Banhammer Now?” – The New York Times. This article examines possible motives for the recent wave of action by social media platforms to police a fraction of the extreme and hateful speech activists and others have been asking them to take down for years. This piece makes the argument that social media platforms are businesses and operate as such and expecting them to behave as de facto public squares dedicated to civil political and societal discourse is more or less how we ended up where we are.
  • TikTok goes tit-for-tat in appeal to MPs: ‘stop political football’ – The Australian. ByteDance is lobbying hard in Canberra to talk Ministers of Parliament out of possibly banning TikTok like the United States has said it is considering. While ByteDance claims the data collected on users in Australia is sent to the US or Singapore, some experts are arguing just to maintain and improve the app would necessarily result in some non-People’s Republic of China (PRC) user data making its way back to the PRC. As Australia’s relationship with the PRC has grown more fraught with allegations PRC hackers infiltrated Parliament and the Prime Minister all but saying PRC hackers were targeting hospitals and medical facilities, the government in Canberra could follow India’s lead and ban the app.
  • Calls for inquiry over claims Catalan lawmaker’s phone was targeted” – The Guardian. British and Spanish newspapers are reporting that an official in Catalonia who favors separating the region from Spain may have had his smartphone compromised with industrial grade spyware typically used only by law enforcement and counterterrorism agencies. The President of the Parliament of Catalonia Roger Torrent claims his phone was hacked for domestic political purposes, which other Catalan leaders argued, too. A spokesperson for the Spanish government said “[t]he government has no evidence that the speaker of the Catalan parliament has been the victim of a hack or theft involving his mobile.” However, the University of Toronto’s CitizenLab, the entity that researched and claimed that Israeli firm NSO Group’s spyware was deployed via WhatsApp to spy on a range of journalists, officials, and dissidents, often by their own governments, confirmed that Torrent’s phone was compromised.
  • While America Looks Away, Autocrats Crack Down on Digital News Sites” – The New York Times. The Trump Administration’s combative relationship with the media in the United States may be encouraging other nations to crack down on digital media outlets trying to hold those governments to account.
  •  “How Facebook Handles Climate Disinformation” – The New York Times. Even though the social media giant has moved aggressively to take down false and inaccurate COVID-19 posts, climate disinformation lives on the social media platform largely unmolested for a couple of reasons. First, Facebook marks these sorts of posts as opinion and take the approach that opinions should be judged under an absolutist free speech regime. Moreover, Facebook asserts posts of this sort do not pose any imminent harm and therefore do not need to be taken down. Despite having teams of fact checkers to vet posts of demonstrably untrue information, Facebook chooses not to, most likely because material that elicits strong reactions from users drive engagement that, in turn, drives advertising dollars.
  • Here’s how President Trump could go after TikTok” – The Washington Post. This piece lays out two means the Trump Administration could employ to press ByteDance in the immediate future: use of the May 2019 Executive Order “Securing the Information and Communications Technology and Services Supply Chain” or the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States process examining ByteDance of the app Music.ly that became TikTok. Left unmentioned in this article is the possibility of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) examining its 2019 settlement with ByteDance to settle violations of the “Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act” (COPPA).
  • You’re Doomscrolling Again. Here’s How to Snap Out of It.” – The New York Times. If you find yourself endlessly looking through social media feeds, this piece explains why and how you might stop doing so.
  • UK selling spyware and wiretaps to 17 repressive regimes including Saudi Arabia and China” – The Independent. There are allegations that the British government has ignored its own regulations on selling equipment and systems that can be used for surveillance and spying to other governments with spotty human rights records. Specifically, the United Kingdom (UK) has sold £75m to countries non-governmental organizations (NGO) are rated as “not free.” The claims include nations such as the People’s Republic of China (PRC), the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and others. Not surprisingly, NGOs and the minority Labour party are calling for an investigation and changes.
  • Google sued for allegedly tracking users in apps even after opting out” – c/net. Boies Schiller Flexner filed suit in what will undoubtedly seek to become a class action suit over Google’s alleged continuing to track users even when they turned off tracking features. This follows a suit filed by the same firm against Google in June, claiming its browser Chrome still tracks people when they switch to incognito mode.
  • Secret Trump order gives CIA more powers to launch cyberattacks” – Yahoo! News. It turns out that in addition to signing National Security Presidential Memorandum (NSPM) 13 that revamped and eased offensive cyber operations for the Department of Defense, President Donald Trump signed a presidential finding that has allowed the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to launch its own offensive cyber attacks, mainly at Russia and Iran, according to unnamed former United States (US) officials according to this blockbuster story. Now, the decision to commence with an attack is not vetted by the National Security Council; rather, the CIA makes the decision. Consequently, there have been a number of attacks on US adversaries that until now have not been associated with the US. And, the CIA is apparently not informing the National Security Agency or Cyber Command of its operations, raising the risk of US cyber forces working at cross purposes or against one another in cyberspace. Moreover, a recently released report blamed the lax security environment at the CIA for a massive exfiltration of hacking tools released by Wikileaks. 
  • Facebook’s plan for privacy laws? ‘Co-creating’ them with Congress” – Protocol. In concert with the release of a new white paper, Facebook Deputy Chief Privacy Officer Rob Sherman sat for an interview in which he pledged the company’s willingness to work with Congress to co-develop a national privacy law. However, he would not comment on any of the many privacy bills released thus far or the policy contours of a bill Facebook would favor except for advocating for an enhanced notice and consent regime under which people would be better informed about how their data is being used. Sherman also shrugged off suggestions Facebook may not be welcome given its record of privacy violations. Finally, it bears mention that similar efforts by other companies at the state level have not succeeded as of yet. For example, Microsoft’s efforts in Washington state have not borne fruit in the passage of a privacy law.
  • Deepfake used to attack activist couple shows new disinformation frontier” – Reuters. We are at the beginning of a new age of disinformation in which fake photographs and video will be used to wage campaigns against nations, causes, and people. An activist and his wife were accused of being terrorist sympathizers by a university student who apparently was an elaborate ruse for someone or some group looking to defame the couple. Small errors gave away the ruse this time, but advances in technology are likely to make detection all the harder.
  • Biden, billionaires and corporate accounts targeted in Twitter hack” – The Washington Post. Policymakers and security experts were alarmed when the accounts of major figures like Bill Gates and Barack Obama were hacked yesterday by some group seeking to sell bitcoin. They argue Twitter was lucky this time and a more ideologically motivated enemy may seek to cause havoc, say on the United States’ coming election. A number of experts are claiming the penetration of the platform must have been of internal controls for so many high profile accounts to be taken over at the same time.
  • TikTok Enlists Army of Lobbyists as Suspicions Over China Ties Grow” – The New York Times. ByteDance’s payments for lobbying services in Washington doubled between the last quarter of 2019 and thirst quarter of 2020, as the company has retained more than 35 lobbyists to push back against the Trump Administration’s rhetoric and policy changes. The company is fighting against a floated proposal to ban the TikTok app on national security grounds, which would cut the company off from another of its top markets after India banned it and scores of other apps from the People’s Republic of China. Even if the Administration does not bar use of the app in the United States, the company is facing legislation that would ban its use on federal networks and devices that will be acted upon next week by a Senate committee. Moreover, ByteDance’s acquisition of the app that became TikTok is facing a retrospective review of an inter-agency committee for national security considerations that could result in an unwinding of the deal. Moreover, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has been urged to review ByteDance’s compliance with a 2019 settlement that the company violated regulations protecting the privacy of children that could result in multi-billion dollar liability if wrongdoing is found.
  • Why Google and Facebook Are Racing to Invest in India” – Foreign Policy. With New Delhi banning 59 apps and platforms from the People’s Republic of China (PRC), two American firms have invested in an Indian giant with an eye toward the nearly 500 million Indians not yet online. Reliance Industries’ Jio Platforms have sold stakes to Google and Facebook worth $4.5 billion and $5.7 billion that gives them prized positions as the company looks to expand into 5G and other online ventures. This will undoubtedly give a leg up to the United States’ online giants in vying with competitors to the world’s second most populous nation.
  • “Outright Lies”: Voting Misinformation Flourishes on Facebook” – ProPublica. In this piece published with First Draft, “a global nonprofit that researches misinformation,” an analysis of the most popular claims made about mail voting show that many of them are inaccurate or false, thus violating the platforms terms of services yet Facebook has done nothing to remove them or mark them as inaccurate until this article was being written.
  • Inside America’s Secretive $2 Billion Research Hub” – Forbes. Using contract information obtained through Freedom of Information requests and interviews, light is shined on the little known non-profit MITRE Corporation that has been helping the United States government address numerous technological problems since the late 1950’s. The article uncovers some of its latest, federally funded projects that are raising eyebrows among privacy advocates: technology to life people’s fingerprints from social media pictures, technology to scan and copy Internet of Things (IoT) devices from a distance, a scanner to read a person’s DNA, and others.
  • The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool” – Forbes. In his second blockbuster article in a week, Forbes reporter Thomas Brewster exposes how the United States (US) government is using questionable court orders to gather travel information from the three companies that essentially provide airlines, hotels, and other travel entities with back-end functions with respect to reservations and bookings. The three companies, one of whom, Sabre is a US multinational, have masses of information on you if you have ever traveled, and US law enforcement agencies, namely the Federal Bureau of Investigation, is using a 1789 statute to obtain orders all three companies have to obey for information in tracking suspects. Allegedly, this capability has only been used to track terror suspects but will now reportedly be used for COVID-19 tracking.
  • With Trump CIA directive, the cyber offense pendulum swings too far” – Yahoo! News. Former United States (US) National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke argues against the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) having carte blanche in conducting cyber operations without the review or input of other federal agencies. He suggests that the CIA in particular, and agencies in general, tend to push their authority to the extreme, which in this case could lead to incidents and lasting precedents in cyberspace that may haunt the US. Clarke also intimated that it may have been the CIA and not Israel that launched cyber attacks on infrastructure facilities in Tehran this month and last.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Senate Consideration of NDAA Continues

Slowly, the Senate works on its NDAA by adding a number of amendments including a few standalone technology bills. However, an election security bill was stripped out of the FY 2021 Intelligence Authorization before it was added to the NDAA.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

The Senate continued its consideration of the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021“ (S.4049) this week before recessing for the 4 July holiday. Work will continue later this month on the massive authorization package that sets annual policy for the Department of Defense (DOD) and related agencies. However, before leaving Washington, DC, the Senate did deal with some of the amendments offered for adoption by adding a number en bloc, some of which pertain to technology policy and funding.

The following amendments were adopted on 2 July 3, 2020 en bloc by unanimous consent:

  • The Department of Homeland of Security “shall produce a report on the state of digital content forgery technology” within one year of enactment and then every five years
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense, with appropriate representatives of the Armed Forces, shall brief the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the feasibility and the current status of assigning members of the Armed Forces on active duty to the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) of the Department of Defense.”
  • “the Secretary of Homeland Security shall conduct a comprehensive review of the ability of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency to fulfill–
    • the missions of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency; and
    • the recommendations detailed in the report issued by the Cyberspace Solarium Commission”
  • The “Developing Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things Act” (DIGIT Act) (S.1611) that would require the Department of Commerce to “convene a working group of Federal stakeholders for the purpose of providing recommendations and a report to Congress relating to the aspects of the Internet of Things.”
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of the National Reconnaissance Office and the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, shall leverage, to the maximum extent practicable, the capabilities of United States industry, including through the use of commercial geospatial-intelligence services and acquisition of commercial satellite imagery.”
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense is authorized to establish a pilot program to explore the use of consumption-based solutions to address software-intensive warfighting capability” per a re commendation made by the Section 809 Panel.
  • “[T]he Secretary of Defense shall complete a study on the cyberexploitation of the personal  information and accounts of members of the Armed Forces and their families.”
  • A modified version of the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act” (S.3189) that “would reassert U.S. and Western leadership by encouraging competition with Huawei that capitalizes on U.S. software advantages, accelerating development of an open-architecture model (known as O-RAN) that would allow for alternative vendors to enter the market for specific network components, rather than having to compete with Huawei end-to-end” according to a press release.

Additionally, a deal was struck to add the “Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (S.3905) to S.4049 but without a bill included in the package as reported out of the Senate Intelligence Committee: the “Foreign Influence Reporting in Elections Act” (FIRE Act) (S.2242). The sponsor of the FIRE Act, Senate Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Mark Warner (D-VA), went to the Senate floor to protest the striking of his bill and to announce his plans to offer it as an amendment and force a vote:

The  committee  voted  14  to  1  to  pass an intel authorization bill that included  the  FIRE  Act,  the  act  that  I  just described, so that if a foreign government interferes or offers you assistance  or  offers  you  dirt,  you  don’t  say  thanks;  you  call  the  FBI.  So  you  can  imagine  my  surprise  and  frustration  when  I  learned  of  a  backroom  deal  to  strip  the  FIRE  Act  out  of  the  Intelligence   Committee’s   legislation   because  of  a  supposed  turf  war  with  another committee. I  am  back  again  today  because  the  security  of  our  elections  cannot  wait.  Let’s  not  hide  behind  process  or  jurisdictional  boundaries.  The  stakes  are  far  too  high  to  continue  the  partisan  blockade  of  election  security  legislation  that  we  have  seen  over  the  last  3  years. If,  behind  closed  doors,  my  Republican  colleagues  want  to  strip  this  legislation  out  of  the  NDAA,  then  I  am  going  to  offer  it  up  as  an  amendment  to  force  an  up-or-down  vote  and  put  every   Member   of   this   body   on   the   record: Are you for election security or are you for allowing foreign entities to interfere  and  offer  assistance  with  no  requirement to report?

Prior to its inclusion in the FY 2021 Intelligence Authorization Act, Warner had asked unanimous consent to take up the FIRE Act multiple times but was met with Republican objections each time. And there are other election security bills Republicans have continued to block, including:

  • The “Duty To Report Act” (S.1247)
  • The “Senate Cybersecurity Protection Act” (S.890)
  • The “Securing America’s Federal Elections Act” (SAFE Act) (H.R.2722)
  • The “Secure Elections Act of 2019” (S.1540)

Yet, the Senate has taken up and passed two election-related bills addressing facets of the cybersecurity challenges. On July 17, the Senate passed the “Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act” (S. 1321) by unanimous consent that would “make it a federal crime to hack any voting systems used in a federal election” according to the Senate Judiciary Committee’s website. In June the Senate also passed the “Defending Elections against Trolls from Enemy Regimes (DETER) Act” (S. 1328) that “will make “improper interference in U.S. elections” a violation of U.S. immigration law, and violators would be barred from obtaining a visa to enter the United States. The House has yet to act on these bills.

When the Senate returns to the bill on 20 July, a number of amendments will be pending, including one to establish semiconductor manufacturing grants.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

NDAA Markup Finishes In House

The House’s NDAA was moved out of committee and it would alter a range of technology programs and initiatives at the Pentagon. The bill may be considered by the full House later this month.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

The House Armed Services Committee marked up and reported out the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (NDAA) (H.R.6395), three weeks after the Senate Armed Services Committee did the same with its NDAA. The two packages authorize very similar top-line funding for the Department of Defense (DOD) and non-DOD defense programs (most of which are the Department of Energy’s nuclear weapons programs) that largely meets the Trump Administration’s overall funding request of roughly $731 billion, including $69 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). And, the annual authorization package is full of technology provisions that affect the DOD, related agencies, private sector contractors, and other nations. The House may take up H.R.6395 this month, which will likely result in more changes being made to the package.

Chair Adam Smith (D-WA) released his Mark (i.e. the full text of his proposed FY 2021 NDAA that served as the base text for the markup). This bill also added sections that were not included in the subcommittee marks, and with respect to cyber-policy, the Chair’s Mark added two provisions:

  • Section 1622—Cyberspace Solarium Commission
    • This section would modify section 1652 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115–232) to update the Cyberspace Solarium Commission’s membership. Additionally, this section would permit the organization to extend further for the purposes of providing regular updates to the legislative and executive branches on the implementation of the Commission’s findings. 
  • Section 1624—Responsibility for the Sector Risk Management Agency Function of the Department of Defense
    • This section would assign full responsibility for certification, coordination, harmonization, and deconfliction of the various efforts, initiatives, and programs that the Department of Defense manages in the furtherance of its responsibilities as the Sector-Specific Agency (SSA) for the Defense Industrial Base to the Principal Cyber Advisor. Presently, the Department is the only SSA that has not unified its various physical and cybersecurity efforts under one organization. For the purposes of carrying out its SSA mission, the Principal Cyber Advisor will be tasked with the management of all functions associated with SSAs under Presidential Policy Directive-21.

The Chair’s Mark has a number of cybersecurity provisions in the Committee Report:

  • [T]he committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by January 15, 2021, regarding the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program.
  • Consistent with draft regulation issued in November 2019, and the anticipated August 2020 regulation related to this statute, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than December 1, 2020, on the implementation status of the full requirements in section 889 of the FY 2019 NDAA that effectively bans Huawei, ZTE, Hytera, Hikvision, or Dahua systems or equipment from DOD and federal government systems and networks.

Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee’s Mark contains the following Committee Report language:

  • [T]he committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer, to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 31, 2021, on the status of the Department’s implementation of the [21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act (IDEA) (P.L. 115-336)] across the defense enterprise.
  • The committee directs the Chief Information Officer of the Department of Defense, in coordination with chief information officers of the military services, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than September 1, 2021, on the processes in place for asset discovery and management of hardware and software products.
  • [T]he committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2021, to examine the issue of internet architecture security.

The Committee adopted hundreds of amendments during its hours long markup, some of which pertained to defense technology issues. The Committee wrote this summary of selected provisions adopted in this package in the jurisdiction of the Intelligence & Emerging Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee offered by a range of Members:

  • Amends Sec. 1286 of the FY 2019 NDAA by adding to the requirements a publication deadline and public release of a list of Chinese and Russian academic institutions with a history of improper technology transfer and other malign behavior.
  • Directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than 1 December 2020, on the information environment segmentation methodology framework.
  • Requires a GAO study of DOD’s Cyber vulnerability assessment efforts.
  • Requires DOD to submit a report to Congress on DOD components cyber hygiene practices and directs the GAO to review that report and brief the Committees on its findings.
  • To provide a briefing to HASC on improving the cybersecurity of disadvantaged small businesses in the defense industrial base.
  • National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) recommendations including
    • “a  steering  committee  on  emerging  technology  and  national  security  threats;”
    • “the  Secretary  of  Defense  shall  develop  and  implement  a  program  to  provide  covered  human  resources  personnel  with  training  in  the  fields  of  software  development,  data  science,  and  artificial  intelligence,  as  such  fields  related  to  the  duties  of  such  personnel;”
    • “a  pilot  program  under which applicants for technical positions within the Department  of  Defense  will  be  evaluated,  in  part,  based  on  electronic  portfolios  of  the  applicant’s  work;”
  • Briefing on use of Artificial Intelligence to analyze beneficial ownership of defense contractors
  • Establishes a National Artificial Intelligence Initiative
  • GAO Study and Report on Electronic Continuity of Operations on the Department of Defense
  • Package of recommendations on artificial intelligence (AI) and emerging technologies from the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI), including:
    • a program under which qualified professors and students may be employed on a part-time or term basis in an organization of the Defense science and technology enterprise for the purpose of conducting a research project
    • an advisory panel on microelectronics leadership and competitiveness
    • the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center…shall conduct an assessment to determine whether the Department of Defense has the ability to ensure that any artificial intelligence technology acquired by the Department is ethically and responsibly developed.
  • Amending report language on “Ties between Russia and China” to include assessment on defense cooperation and coordination between Russia and China
  • Requires a report on the applicability of using automated technologies related to computer aided manufacturing software and similar manufacturing technologies to address repair part obsolesce issues and part obsolesce issues and parts shortages across the organic industrial base.
  • To require a plan on spectrum information technology modernization and a program to identify and mitigate vulnerabilities in the military’s telecommunications infrastructure
  • The DOD lacks a similar comprehensive understanding of the Internet-connected assets and attack surface across the DOD enterprise. Amends existing DRL to require a briefing on the current and planned capabilities and concept of operations for Internet operations management.

The Committee also offered summaries of the following provisions adopted across three amendments:

  • Chair’s Mark En Bloc #1
    • Report on Supply Chain Security Cooperation with Taiwan
    • Directs the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission to brief the committee on any plans, opportunities, and/or challenges the Commission has for sharing its expertise and cooperation with similar organizations among U.S. partners and allies
    • Encourages the Secretary of Defense to take into account the security risks, including threats to operational and information security, of 5G and 6G telecommunications networks in all future overseas stationing decisions
  • Chair’s Mark En Bloc #2
    • Cyber Threat Information Collaboration Environment (JCE)
    • Establishment of the Integrated Cyber Center
    • Cybersecurity Threat Hunting and Sensing, Discovery, and Mitigation
    • The  DOD “shall  establish  a  threat  intelligence  program  to  share  with  and  obtain  from  the  defense  industrial  base  information  and  intelligence  on  threats  to  national  security” that would include cybersecurity incident reporting for defense contractors
    • Requires a study and recommendations from NIST on China’s influence in international standards setting bodies for emerging tech.
    • Requirement to Buy Certain Satellite Component from National Technology and Industrial Base
    • Sense of Congress on the intent and implementation of the Section 889 of the FY19 National Defense Authorization Act pertaining to the prohibition on certain telecommunications and video surveillance services or equipment
    • Extends and modernizes required reporting by the Department of Defense on Chinese Communist Party military companies operating in the United States
  • Chair’s Mark En Bloc #3
    • DRL requiring a briefing from USD(A&S) on how DOD and the CMMC-AB plan to mitigate potential organizational conflicts of interest [between] contractors and third-party assessment organizations performing CMMC certifications
    • To provide assistance to small manufacturers in the defense industrial supply chain with improving cybersecurity
    • GAO Report on GSA e-commerce Portal Data Usage and Competition

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

House Armed Services Begins Its Mark Up of NDAA; Senate Files Its NDAA

The House and Senate’s NDAAs are full of cyber-related language, including a number of CSC recommendations.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

Two weeks after the Senate Armed Services Committees marked up its FY 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the House Armed Services Committee began marking up its NDAA. This annual legislation sets cybersecurity and technology policy and funding levels for the Department of Defense and its myriad agencies that often later public and private sector policy directly or indirectly. The Senate also began consideration of its bill this week, and the House could follow suit on its package next month.

On 22 June, the Intelligence and Emerging Threats & Capabilities Subcommittee met and marked up their portion of the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (H.R.6395), but not all the bill text was released before the hearing. Nevertheless, in the summary of legislative language provided along with selected bill text, the subcommittee explained some of the cybersecurity provisions in the FY 2021 NDAA:

  • Section 1621—Cyber Mission Forces and Cyberspace Operations Forces
    • This section would amend section 238 of title 10, United States Code, to reflect the need for consolidated budget displays for both the cyber mission forces, as well as the newly created cyber operations forces. Additionally, this would amend an existing requirement for the cyber and information technology budgets to be delivered to Congress in print and electronically, not later than 5 days after the release of the President’s budget request.
  • Section 1623—Tailored Cyberspace Operations Organizations
    • This section would direct the Secretary of the Navy, in conjunction with the Chief of Naval Operations, to produce a study on the Navy Cyber Warfare Development Group, a small niche organization aligned to the Navy’s service cyber component. This section also would authorize other military services and U.S. Special Operations Command to create counterpart organizations to Navy Cyber Warfare Development Group.
  • Section 1625—Department of Defense Cyber Workforce Efforts
    • This section would direct the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer to:
      • study and expand the model used at the National Security Agency(NSA) that authorizes NSA employees to use up to 140 hours of paid time toward NSA cyber education efforts in local communities. This would explicitly authorize select Department of Defense civilians who are part of the Cyber Excepted Service to utilize paid time toward wider national efforts aimed at addressing the cyber workforce shortage;
      • study and report, in conjunction with the military services, to the congressional defense committees on how the Training With Industry program can be strengthened and better utilized by the services; and
      • study the synchronization between NSA GenCyber program and the Centers for Academic Excellence and report to the congressional defense committees on how the two programs can be better integrated and harmonized.
  • Section 1626—Reporting Requirements for Cross Domain Compromises and Exemptions to Policies for Information Technology
    • This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to report monthly to the congressional defense committees on all cross domain compromises within the Department of Defense Information Network. Additionally, this section would direct the Secretary of Defense to report biannually to the congressional defense committees on all current exemptions to information technology policies. The intent is to establish a baseline for legislative oversight on areas where the Department of Defense has accepted risk to its networks and systems.
  • Section 1627—Assessing Private-Public Collaboration in Cybersecurity
    • This section would assess the impact of the current Pathfinder initiatives, prospects for making existing Pathfinder pilots more robust, and whether and how to expand Pathfinder or similar models of public-private collaboration to other critical infrastructure sectors, particularly systemically important critical infrastructure. Developing institutional support for Pathfinder-type initiatives not only creates opportunities for increased collaboration across critical sectors, as prioritized by Federal departments and agencies, but will also buttress and accelerate nascent efforts and increase their chances of success.
  • Section 1628—Cyber Capabilities and Interoperability of the National Guard
    • This section would direct the Department of Defense to update existing policies to consider National Guard activities that could be performed and reimbursed under title 32, United States Code.
  • Section 1629—Evaluation of Non-Traditional Cyber Support to the Department of Defense
    • This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to assess the feasibility and need for a cyber reserve force, the composition of a reserve force, and the structure of a reserve force (e.g., a retainer model, a non-traditional reserve, auxiliary model).

The full House Armed Services Committee will markup the entire bill on 1 July, and in advance of this hearing the full text of the bill (aka the Chair’s Mark) will likely be released. Traditionally, this markup takes the better part of a day. It is likely cybersecurity and technology matters will be discussed and details in the bill amended.

The “Senate Armed Services Committee released its text for the “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021“ (S.4049), and the Senate began consideration of the bill this week, with the invocation of cloture on the motion to proceed on 25 June by a 90-7 vote. The Committee also released the Committee Report to accompany S.4049, which summarizes the myriad cybersecurity and technology provisions, most of which are directed to the DOD, its contractors and suppliers.

The cybersecurity provisions in S.4049 would change, alter, or establish a range of programs and operations. The bill would modify the statutory duties of Department of Defense’s Principal Cyber Advisor to require that the person chosen for this role is a civilian at the Pentagon who holds a position requiring Senate confirmation. The DOD would need to develop and implement a framework for forward hunt operations (i.e. offensive cyber operations) to address some of the issues the committee’s oversight turned up. The focus on this exercise would be to get a better understanding on the utility and life span of intelligence gained through such operations. The Pentagon’s reporting duties after executing an offensive or defensive cyber operation would be expanded to include nations and entities with whom the United States is not at war. The Committee expanded the DOD’s required briefings on cyber operations, expressing frustration with the Department’s “unwillingness to keep the committee apprised of cyber operations conducted to gain access to adversary systems, including those conducted pursuant to standing military plans against military targets.”

There is language mandating that the DOD begin the process of harmonizing the Pentagon’s cyber capabilities and those provided by private sector contractors, much of which overlaps in the view of the committee. Cyber Command would receive expanded but necessarily acquisition authority as the service branches are to remain the entities undertaking large procurements. The Principal Cyber Advisor and head of Cyber Command would need to assess how well the DOD manages inter-agency conflict in the Pentagon and among Intelligence Community agencies in managing the process by which cyber operations are designed and executed, suggesting there is significant internal friction among the stakeholders. The DOD would need to conduct a pilot on the feasibility of adopting and using a commercial practice of speed-based cybersecurity metrics. The Pentagon would also need to better integrate its data collection and data analysis regarding potentially malicious or illegal activities by DOD employees and contractors (i.e. so-called insider threat).

The DOD would need “to develop a comprehensive plan, by February 1, 2021, for the deployment of commercial-off-the-shelf solutions on supplier networks to monitor the public-facing Internet attack surface of members of the defense industrial base (DIB)” that is intended to supplement the DOD’s new Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification and other DOD efforts to shore up the cybersecurity of its contractors. The bill would grant a DOD request to receive the authority to immediately react and respond to reported threats and penetrations to “operationally critical” DOD contractors’ systems and networks. The DOD would need “to conduct a baseline review of the Joint Regional Security Stacks (JRSS) activity to determine whether the initiative should continue, but as a program of record, or should be replaced by an improved design and modern technology.” The DOD would also receive limited flexibility to use Operation and Maintenance (O&M) “for cyber operations-peculiar capability development projects.” The committee also conditioned the availability of certain Office of the Secretary of Defense travel on fulfilling a requirement in the current year’s NDAA to submit “a report for the structuring and manning of information operations capabilities and forces” in the DOD, develop “a strategy for operations in the information environment” and to “conduct an information operations posture review.”

The Cyberspace Solarium Commission (CSC) would have its mandate extended so it could monitor, assess, and report on the implementation of its 75 recommendations made in March 2020. The bill includes a number of CSC recommendations, including:

  • Adding “a force structure assessment of the Department of Defense’s Cyber Operations Forces to future cyber posture reviews.”
  • “a report to the congressional defense committees, detailing the actions that the Secretary will undertake to ensure that the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, has enhanced authority, direction, and control of the Cyber Operations Forces and of the equipment budget that enables Cyber Operations Forces’ operations and readiness, beginning with fiscal year 2024 budget request.”
  • Assessing “options for establishing a cyber reserve force.”
  • A comprehensive plan for “[e]nsuring cyber resiliency of nuclear command and control system”
  • Requiring “the Secretary of Defense to establish policies and requirements for each major weapon system, and the priority critical infrastructure essential to the proper functioning of major weapon systems in broader mission areas, to be re-assessed for cyber vulnerabilities.”
  • Mandating that the Secretary of Defense “establish a threat intelligence sharing program to share threat intelligence with and obtain threat intelligence from the defense industrial base.”
  • Requiring the Pentagon “to conduct an assessment of the adequacy of threat hunting elements of the Cyber Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program and the need for continuous threat monitoring operations.”
  • Addressing “the risks to National Security Systems (NSSs) posed by quantum computing by requiring the Secretary of Defense to: (1) Complete an assessment of current and potential threats to critical NSSs and the standards used for quantum-resistant cryptography; and (2) Provide recommendations for research and development activities to secure NSSs.”
  • Study the feasibility of establishment of a National Cyber Director.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Senate Armed Services Marks Up FY 2021 NDAA

Per usual, the NDAA contains a number of technology related provisions, including a some of the CSC’s recommendations. The People’s Republic of China and the Russian Federation continue to receive attention.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

This week, legislative work began on the FY 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The Senate Armed Services Committee conducted markups at the subcommittee and committee level, almost of which were in closed settings, and announced a finished bill that has not yet been made available per committee tradition. However, as in years past, a summary of the NDAA has been released that provides a high level overview of the bill, including its cybersecurity and technology related provisions. Bill text will not likely be released before the bill comes to the Senate floor.

Most notably, a number of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission’s (CSC) recommendations were apparently included in the bill, an outcome the four CSC Members who also serve in Congress were working towards; Senators Ben Sasse (R-NE) and Angus King (I-ME) served on the CSC and are also on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

The CSC’s highest profile recommendation was not entirely accepted, however. The CSC had called for a National Cyber Director its final report that would be “be the President’s principal advisor for cybersecurity-related issues, as well as lead national-level coordination of cybersecurity strategy and policy, both within government and with the private sector.” However, the FY 2021 NDAA merely uses an old strategy on possibly controversial changes: a study would be conducted on a National Cyber Director. Nevertheless, the CSC’s mandate would be extended another 16 months if this legislation is enacted, giving the body more time to work to see this and other recommendations possibly come to fruition.

All of the recommendations in the FY 2021 NDAA are those within the jurisdiction of the Armed Services Committees, suggesting the non-defense cybersecurity recommendations will need to be enacted by the various committees of jurisdiction. Ironically, this is the very issue the CSC addressed in its recommendation that Congress establish “House Permanent Select and Senate Select Committees on Cybersecurity.” However, it is a rare occurrence for Congress to redraw committee jurisdictions in such a significant way, and the Homeland Security Committees were created after the attacks on the United States on 11 September 2001. And yet, it is not uncommon for legislation that pertains mostly to civilian agencies and affairs to get added to the NDAA. For example, the “Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform” (FITARA) (P.L. 113-291) was enacted as part of the FY 2013 NDAA.

The Committee explained that the NDAA includes 11 of the CSC’s recommendations:

  • A review of National Guard response to cyberattacks,
  • Adding a force structure assessment in the quadrennial cyber posture review,
  • A report on enabling Cyber Command authorities, direction, and control of Cyber Operations Forces-related budgets, ensuring flexibility and agility to control acquisition,
  • An evaluation of cyber reserve force options, which could provide capable surge capability and enable DOD to draw on cyber talent in the department sector,
  • Improving cyber resiliency of nuclear command and control systems,
  • A modification to fortify the Strategic Cybersecurity program and further cyber vulnerability assessment of weapons systems,
  • A Defense Industrial Base threat intelligence sharing program to support companies’ ability to defend themselves,
  • An assessment of the risk posed by quantum computing to national security systems,
  • An extension of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission for tracking and facilitating the implementation of its recommendations for 16 months,
  • An independent assessment on the feasibility and advisability of establishing a National Cyber Director.

The House Armed Services Committee will begin marking up its FY 2021 NDAA later this month with a full committee markup scheduled for 1 July. It is very likely CSC recommendations make it into this bill, and so it will be a matter of final negotiations to determine which recommendations are part of the bill, which is seen as must-pass on Capitol Hill. Moreover, CSC recommendations could get folded into appropriations bills for FY 2021, which is often one of the last matters Congress addresses before recessing for the winter holidays.

The Committee highlighted other cybersecurity and cyberspace provisions:

  • Updates the responsibilities of the Principal Cyber Advisor, a key driver of the Department’s development and implementation of its 2018 cyber strategy, by increasing the integration and coordination responsibilities of that office to ensure that DOD’s cyber policies are coherent, cohesive, and meet needs,
  • Improves transparency and requires DOD to provide more regular updates on cyber operations to Congress,
  • Requires pilot programs, demonstrations, and/or plans for: speed-based cybersecurity capability metrics to measure DOD performance and effectiveness; interoperability and automated orchestration of cybersecurity systems (increased by $10 million above the President’s request); addressing network timing and address inconsistencies; and integration of user activity monitoring and cybersecurity systems,
  • Requires an assessment of gaps between Cyber Mission Forces and Cybersecurity Service Providers,
  • Authorizes increased funding ($25 million for Air Force Operation and Maintenance and $5 million for Army Operation and Maintenance) to provide Cyber Mission Forces with more resources to access, operate, and train as required by increased operational demands,
  • Improves cyber readiness and “man, train, and equip” by:
    • Authorizing a pilot program to prepare the National Guard for providing cyber assistance remotely in the case of cyber attacks,
    • Prohibiting the Secretary of Defense from taking any action on the National Defense University’s College of Information and Cyber Space until completing an assessment of educational requirements for military and civilian leaders in this domain,
    • Modifying authority to use Operation and Maintenance funds to allow for rapid creation, testing, and fielding of cyber capabilities to respond more quickly to threats, and
    • Improving the training and retention of highly qualified cyber personnel, including providing Cyber Command with the same hiring authority for technical talent as exists at DARPA, the Strategic Capabilities Office, and the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, and by allowing for pay that is more competitive with commercial industry.

Again, the Committee addressed the threats posed by the DOD having a significant part of its supply chain rooted in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the challenges posed by the nation to US military and national security:

  • The FY21 NDAA takes numerous steps to reshape the Defense Industrial Base as a National Security Innovation Base, expanding its industrial capacity, promoting agility and resiliency, and identifying and mitigating risks associated with reliance on foreign adversaries, while investing in relationships with allies and partners. The shift to a National Security Innovation Base requires acknowledging that a whole-of-government approach is needed, and this bill encourages DOD to study broad factors that shape the industrial base and engage with outside stakeholders and interests. Recognizing that procurement restrictions are very powerful, the bill also ensures DOD is exploring all pathways to expand domestic capacity, including increased research and development. Lastly, the legislation safeguards proprietary technology, intellectual property, and other defense-sensitive data from being infiltrated by the government of China.
  • Further implements recommendations from DOD’s report proceeding from Executive Order 13806 on assessing and strengthening the manufacturing and defense industrial base and supply chain resiliency of the U.S., and updates the framework for modernizing acquisition processes to ensure the integrity of the Defense Industrial Base,
  • Requires analyses of a variety of materials and technology sectors, such as microelectronics, rare earth minerals, medical devices, personal protective equipment and pharmaceutical ingredients, to determine actions to take to address sourcing and industrial capacity,
  • Directs additional steps for certain items, such as microelectronics, printed circuit boards, critical raw materials, and unmanned aircraft systems to mitigate risk of relying on foreign sources for products, materials, components, and manufacturing,
  • Strengthens the National Technology and Industrial Base (NTIB) by creating a Regulatory Council and directing DOD to establish a process for admitting new members,
  • Requires assessment of foreign industrial base capabilities and capacity to see how these drive risk to the U.S. from overreliance on China and their economic aggression,
  • Continues to expand the role of small business, extending the authorization of a pilot program to streamline contracting and auditing processes for innovative technology programs and ensuring DOD pays small business contractors quickly,
  • Directs steps to safeguard defense-sensitive U.S. intellectual property and technology from acquisition by China and with post-employment restricts pertaining to China.

The Committee highlighted provisions aimed at the PRC and Russia:

  • Extends the limitation on providing sensitive missile defense information to Russia and on the integration of U.S. missile defense systems into those of China and Russia,
  • Requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report on the risk to DOD personnel, equipment, and operations due to Huawei 5G architecture in host countries and possible steps for mitigation,
  • Requires the Secretary of Defense to consider 5G and 6G security risks posed by vendors like Huawei and ZTE when making overseas basing decisions,
  • Protects the defense industrial base and supply chain, as well as intellectual property and technology, from disruption, infiltration, or theft by the Government of China (see “Innovation Base”),
  • Fully funds the European Deterrence Initiative and increases funding to support rotational forces in Europe,
  • Requires a report on Russian support to racially and ethnically motivated violent extremist groups and networks in Europe and the United States that creates or causes growing national security threats, information warfare, and increasing risks to societal stability and democratic institutions,
  • Extends restrictions on military-to-military cooperation with Russia and any activities that would recognize Russian sovereignty over Crimea,
  • Expresses a sense of the Senate that long-term strategic competition with Russia is a top defense priority that requires sustained investment and enhanced deterrence due to the level of threat posed,

The Committee added

As our strategic competitors develop more and more advanced weapons, equipment, and technology, it’s critical that the United States keep pace through deliberate, knowledge-based development. The FY21 NDAA directs investments and implements policies that will maintain or expand our comparative advantage over China and Russia for key capabilities and technologies. One strategy for accelerating innovation will be through a tailored approach of both subsystem prototypes, including for unmanned surface vessels, and full-scale prototypes, including for hypersonic weapons, based on a detailed understanding of what is necessary to achieve technical and technological maturity.

The bill also

  • Supports the development of fifth-generation (5G) wireless networks by establishing a cross- functional team for 5G wireless networks and designates the DOD Chief Information Officer to lead the team and serve as the senior designated official for related policy, oversight, guidance, and coordination at DOD,
  • Strengthens Science and Technology efforts in emerging technologies, including by requiring: an assessment of U.S. efforts to develop biotechnologies compared to our adversaries; development of Artificial Intelligence use-cases for reform efforts; enhancements to the Quantum Information Science research and development program; and a demonstration of innovative 5G commercial technologies, Encourages DOD to leverage commercially available technology where appropriate, particularly for artificial intelligence,
  • Includes several provisions designed to recruit and retain talent with technology expertise, including requiring a study comparing methods for recruiting and retaining technology researchers used by both the U.S. and Chinese governments and authorizing a pilot program to permit university students and faculty to take on part-time and term employment at DOD labs to work on critical technologies and research activities,

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.