House Starts Consideration of Its NDAA

The House will consider scores of amendments to change US technology policy, including a number of implement the recommendations of a congressional cybersecurity panel. However, some may not be in the final NDAA.

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

As is almost always the case, House Members are using the occasion of the annual consideration of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to offer a range of amendments to the House Rules Committee. Hundreds of amendments were submitted, and at the 17 July hearing, the Committee determined which would be made in order and allow to be debated on the House floor, including scores of technology amendments. Many of these amendments to the “William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021” (H.R.6395) would change US technology policy and funding, and some are complete bills the House has already passed, for inclusion in the NDAA increases the chances of enactment. Among the higher profile amendments made in order is one offered by Cyberspace Solarium Commission members that would establish a National Cyber Director position in the White House that the Senate declined to include in its FY 2021 NDAA, suggesting addition to the House’s bill does not necessarily this provision will make it into law.

Earlier today, the House began its consideration of H.R.6395, which may take up the better part of the week. The House Rules Committee made the following amendments in order to be offered during debate that pertain to technology:

The House Armed Services Committee has also released its Committee Report in two parts (Volume I and II) and detailed the overall funding authorized by the package:

H.R. 6395 supports an overall authorization of $740.5 billion dollars for our national defense. H.R. 6395 would authorize approximately $662.6 billion in discretionary spending for national defense and approximately $69.0 billion in discretionary spending for Over-seas Contingency Operations. This authorization level will allow our military to maintain readiness, expand capabilities, and invest in the new software and technologies required to secure our country.

The committee included a number of requests and directives of the DOD and other agencies, including but not limited to:

  • Report on Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification
    • The committee acknowledges that the Department of Defense has taken initial steps to ensure that its contractors are aware of the actions necessary to protect the government’s data and networks from cybersecurity threats. However, the committee is concerned that there remain key unanswered questions about how it will implement its cybersecurity framework, especially given the level of collaboration necessary between industry and government for its success. Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by January 15, 2021, regarding the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program.
  • Report on Ties between Russia and China
    • The Department of Defense has acknowledged that China and Russia are increasingly working in cooperation on a wide range of matters, including economically, politically, and militarily; and that the Department believes the growing ties between Russia and China are challenging the rules-based order and present a threat to U.S. national security interests. The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy highlights the joint force’s eroding competitive edge against China and Russia. The committee endeavors to fully understand the extent of the ties between Russia and China. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of National Intelligence, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to submit a report to the congressional defense committees and the congressional intelligence committees by March 1, 2021, on the relationship between China and Russia.
  • Fourth Estate Network Optimization
    • The committee recognizes the importance of creating efficiencies and cost savings within the Fourth Estate and across the Department of Defense, to include the consolidation of information technology services away from legacy common use information technology services into a single service provider (SSP). The committee notes that on August 15, 2019 the Deputy Secretary of Defense directed the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to execute such consolidation under the Fourth Estate Network Optimization (4ENO) effort over the period of fiscal year 2020 to fiscal year 2024. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not later than February 1, 2021, on the status of the consolidation effort, including details on the schedule and plan for consolidation, progress on the transition of each Defense Agency and Field Activity (DAFA) from common use information technology services into the SSP environment, the list of assets and services being transitioned, a list of assets and services remaining within each DAFA, a justification for assets not transitioned, and the reallocation of funding as a result of the transition.
  • GAO Assessment on DOD Cyber Incident Management Efforts
    • The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) has experienced a number of high-profile breaches to Department of Defense (DOD) systems and networks. For example, in July 2015, a phishing attack on the Joint Chiefs of Staff unclassified email servers resulted in the system being shut down for more than a week while cyber experts rebuilt the network, affecting the work of roughly 4,000 military and civilian personnel. In 2018, DOD disclosed a data breach to its contracted travel management system that allegedly affected approximately 30,000 military and civilian employees. In 2020, DOD similarly acknowledged that the Defense Information Systems Agency networks were breached that reportedly resulted in the personal data of approximately 200,000 network users being compromised.
    • The committee is concerned that while DOD established the Joint Force Headquarters–DOD Information Network (JFHQ– DODIN) to operationalize and defend DOD systems and networks, other DOD components still view these systems and networks as an administrative capability. Cyber incidents, such as those identified above, can disrupt critical military operations, lead to inappropriate access to and modification of sensitive information, result in long-term financial obligations for credit monitoring, and threaten national security. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide the congressional defense committees with an assessment of DOD management of cyber incidents and efforts to mitigate future cyber incidents.
  • GAO Study and Report on Electronic Continuity of Operations on the Department of Defense
    • The committee notes the centrality of electronic command, control, and communications to Department of Defense continuity of operations. To ensure that the committee is fully informed of how the Department of Defense is addressing issues related to the risk to electronic communications, the committee requests that the Comptroller General of the United States conduct a study of electronic communications continuity of operations of the Department of Defense.
  • Information Technology Asset Management and Inventory
    • The committee commends the Department of Defense for the considerable improvement made on information technology, asset discovery, and asset management. However, the committee believes the Department would benefit from an established process for auditing software and hardware inventories. The lack of a single policy framework hinders the capacity of the Department to discover license duplication and the Department is at risk of wasting valuable resources on redundant or underutilized hardware and software. The Department also lacks real-time discovery of and visibility over its network attack surface, particularly its forward-facing internet assets and Department assets held in cloud environments, resulting in increased risk of exposures exploitable by malicious adversaries. The private sector has successfully navigated this challenge through the use of automated software tools widely available on the commercial market.
    • The committee directs the Chief Information Officer of the Department of Defense, in coordination with chief information officers of the military services, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2021, on the processes in place for asset discovery and management of hardware and software products.
  • Internet Architecture Security
    • The committee recognizes that the internet is inextricable and central to the American way of life, and the architecture that enables internet communications is layered, complex, and multi-faceted. The committee notes that this architecture includes high-capacity cables laid underground and underseas, cable landing stations that connect cables from continent to continent, and internet exchange points that serve as clearinghouses for data between Internet Service Providers and content delivery networks; all of which are required for the internet to operate. The committee recognizes that the executive branch has assigned responsibility for components or sectors of critical infrastructure to various executive branch departments and agencies, and internet architecture is approached in a fractured and piecemeal fashion, with multiple government stakeholder entities claiming responsibility. The committee is concerned that the lack of direction on the subject of internet architecture security creates significant risks to the nation. Consequently, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2021, to examine the issue of internet architecture security.
  • Report and GAO Briefing on DOD Cyber Hygiene and Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification Framework
    • Given the importance of implementing cyber hygiene practices that could effectively protect DOD missions, information, and systems and networks, we direct the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the defense committees identifying the extent to which each of the DOD components have implemented cyber hygiene practices and levels identified in the CMMC framework. For each DOD component that does not achieve level 3 status (referred to as ‘‘good cyber hygiene’’ in CMMC Model ver. 1.02), the head of the component is to provide the Congressional defense committees, the DOD Chief Information Officer, the commander of JFHQ–DODIN a plan on how the component will implement those security measures within one year and mitigate potential consequences until those practices are implemented. In order to aid in the under-standing of what cyber hygiene practices have been and have not been implemented by the DOD that the department requires private sector companies to implement before they receive a contract where they would have access to controlled unclassified information, the Secretary of Defense shall submit the DOD report to the Congressional defense committees and the Comptroller General of the United States by March 1, 2021. The committee further directs the Comptroller General to conduct an independent review of the Secretary’s report and provide a briefing to the Congressional defense committees no later than the end of the fiscal year.
  • Department of Defense Artificial Intelligence Capabilities and Strategy
    • The committee believes that global leadership in artificial intelligence (AI) technology is a national security priority. In 2018, the Department of Defense issued a department-wide AI strategy to provide direction for AI development. As the Department increases its investments in AI, machine learning, and other automation technologies, the committee believes that the Department’s re-sources, capabilities, and plans should continue to ensure U.S. competitive advantage over potential adversaries. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide the committee with an assessment of the Department’s resources, capabilities, and plans for AI.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s