Further Reading, Other Development, and Coming Events (4 January 2021)

Further Reading

  • Microsoft Says Russian Hackers Viewed Some of Its Source Code” By Nicole Perlroth — The New York Times. The Sluzhba vneshney razvedki Rossiyskoy Federatsii’s (SVR) hack keeps growing and growing with Microsoft admitting its source code was viewed through an employee account. It may be that authorized Microsoft resellers were one of the vectors by which the SVR accessed SolarWinds, FireEye, and ultimately a number of United States (U.S.) government agencies. Expect more revelations to come about the scope and breadth of entities and systems the SVR compromised.
  • In 2020, we reached peak Internet. Here’s what worked — and what flopped.” By Geoffrey Fowler — The Washington Post. The newspaper’s tech columnist reviews the technology used during the pandemic and what is likely to stay with us when life returns to some semblance of normal.
  • Facebook Says It’s Standing Up Against Apple For Small Businesses. Some Of Its Employees Don’t Believe It.” By Craig Silverman and Ryan Mac — BuzzFeed News. Again, two of the best-sourced journalists when it comes to Facebook have exposed employee dissent within the social media and advertising giant, and this time over the company’s advertising blitz positioning it as the champion of small businesses that allegedly stand to be hurt when Apple rolls out iOS 14 that will allow users to block the type of tracking across apps and the internet Facebook thrives on. The company’s PR campaign stands in contrast to the anecdotal stories about errors that harmed and impeded small companies in using Facebook to advertise and sell products and services to cusstomers.
  • SolarWinds hack spotlights a thorny legal problem: Who to blame for espionage?” By Tim Starks — cyberscoop. This piece previews possible and likely inevitable litigation to follow from the SolarWinds hack, including possible securities action on the basis of fishy dumps of stock by executive, breach of contract, and negligence for failing to patch and address vulnerabilities in a timely fashion. Federal and state regulators will probably get on the field, too. But this will probably take years to play out as Home Depot settled claims arising from its 2014 breach with state attorneys general in November 2020.
  • The Tech Policies the Trump Administration Leaves Behind” By Aaron Boyd — Nextgov. A look back at the good, the bad, and the ugly of the Trump Administration’s technology policies, some of which will live on in the Biden Administration.

Other Developments

  • In response to the SolarWinds hack, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) issued a joint statement indicating that the process established in Pursuant to Presidential Policy Directive (PPD) 41, an Obama Administration policy has been activated and a Cyber Unified Coordination Group (UCG) has been formed “to coordinate a whole-of-government response to this significant cyber incident.” The agencies explained “[t]he UCG is intended to unify the individual efforts of these agencies as they focus on their separate responsibilities.”
    • In PPD-41 it is explained that a UCG “shall serve as the primary method for coordinating between and among Federal agencies in response to a significant cyber incident as well as for integrating private sector partners into incident response efforts, as appropriate.” Moreover, “[t]he Cyber UCG is intended to result in unity of effort and not to alter agency authorities or leadership, oversight, or command responsibilities.”
  • Following the completion of its “in-depth” investigation, the European Commission (EC) cleared Google’s acquisition of Fitbit with certain conditions, removing a significant hurdle for the American multinational in buying the wearable fitness tracker company. In its press release, the EC explained that after its investigation, “the Commission had concerns that the transaction, as initially notified, would have harmed competition in several markets.” To address and allay concerns, Google bound itself for ten years to a set of commitments that can be unilaterally extended by the EC and will be enforced, in part, by the appointment of a trustee to oversee compliance.
    • The EC was particularly concerned about:
      • Advertising: By acquiring Fitbit, Google would acquire (i) the database maintained by Fitbit about its users’ health and fitness; and (ii) the technology to develop a database similar to that of Fitbit. By increasing the already vast amount of data that Google could use for the personalisation of ads, it would be more difficult for rivals to match Google’s services in the markets for online search advertising, online display advertising, and the entire “ad tech” ecosystem. The transaction would therefore raise barriers to entry and expansion for Google’s competitors for these services to the detriment of advertisers, who would ultimately face higher prices and have less choice.
      • Access to Web Application Programming Interface (‘API’) in the market for digital healthcare: A number of players in this market currently access health and fitness data provided by Fitbit through a Web API, in order to provide services to Fitbit users and obtain their data in return. The Commission found that following the transaction, Google might restrict competitors’ access to the Fitbit Web API. Such a strategy would come especially at the detriment of start-ups in the nascent European digital healthcare space.
      • Wrist-worn wearable devices: The Commission is concerned that following the transaction, Google could put competing manufacturers of wrist-worn wearable devices at a disadvantage by degrading their interoperability with Android smartphones.
    • As noted, Google made a number of commitments to address competition concerns:
      • Ads Commitment:
        • Google will not use for Google Ads the health and wellness data collected from wrist-worn wearable devices and other Fitbit devices of users in the EEA, including search advertising, display advertising, and advertising intermediation products. This refers also to data collected via sensors (including GPS) as well as manually inserted data.
        • Google will maintain a technical separation of the relevant Fitbit’s user data. The data will be stored in a “data silo” which will be separate from any other Google data that is used for advertising.
        • Google will ensure that European Economic Area (‘EEA’) users will have an effective choice to grant or deny the use of health and wellness data stored in their Google Account or Fitbit Account by other Google services (such as Google Search, Google Maps, Google Assistant, and YouTube).
      • Web API Access Commitment:
        • Google will maintain access to users’ health and fitness data to software applications through the Fitbit Web API, without charging for access and subject to user consent.
      • Android APIs Commitment:
        • Google will continue to license for free to Android original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) those public APIs covering all current core functionalities that wrist-worn devices need to interoperate with an Android smartphone. Such core functionalities include but are not limited to, connecting via Bluetooth to an Android smartphone, accessing the smartphone’s camera or its GPS. To ensure that this commitment is future-proof, any improvements of those functionalities and relevant updates are also covered.
        • It is not possible for Google to circumvent the Android API commitment by duplicating the core interoperability APIs outside the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This is because, according to the commitments, Google has to keep the functionalities afforded by the core interoperability APIs, including any improvements related to the functionalities, in open-source code in the future. Any improvements to the functionalities of these core interoperability APIs (including if ever they were made available to Fitbit via a private API) also need to be developed in AOSP and offered in open-source code to Fitbit’s competitors.
        • To ensure that wearable device OEMs have also access to future functionalities, Google will grant these OEMs access to all Android APIs that it will make available to Android smartphone app developers including those APIs that are part of Google Mobile Services (GMS), a collection of proprietary Google apps that is not a part of the Android Open Source Project.
        • Google also will not circumvent the Android API commitment by degrading users experience with third party wrist-worn devices through the display of warnings, error messages or permission requests in a discriminatory way or by imposing on wrist-worn devices OEMs discriminatory conditions on the access of their companion app to the Google Play Store.
  • The United States (U.S.) Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has proposed a major rewrite of the regulations governing medical privacy in the U.S. As the U.S. lacks a unified privacy regime, the proposed changes would affect on those entities in the medical sector subject to the regime, which is admittedly many such entities. Nevertheless, it is almost certain the Biden Administration will pause this rulemaking and quite possibly withdraw it should it prove crosswise with the new White House’s policy goals.
    • HHS issued a notice of proposed rulemaking “to modify the Standards for the Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information (Privacy Rule) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (HITECH Act).”
      • HHS continued:
        • The Privacy Rule is one of several rules, collectively known as the HIPAA Rules, that protect the privacy and security of individuals’ medical records and other protected health information (PHI), i.e., individually identifiable health information maintained or transmitted by or on behalf of HIPAA covered entities (i.e., health care providers who conduct covered health care transactions electronically, health plans, and health care clearinghouses).
        • The proposals in this NPRM support the Department’s Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care (Regulatory Sprint), described in detail below. Specifically, the proposals in this NPRM would amend provisions of the Privacy Rule that could present barriers to coordinated care and case management –or impose other regulatory burdens without sufficiently compensating for, or offsetting, such burdens through privacy protections. These regulatory barriers may impede the transformation of the health care system from a system that pays for procedures and services to a system of value-based health care that pays for quality care.
    • In a press release, OCR asserted:
      • The proposed changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule include strengthening individuals’ rights to access their own health information, including electronic information; improving information sharing for care coordination and case management for individuals; facilitating greater family and caregiver involvement in the care of individuals experiencing emergencies or health crises; enhancing flexibilities for disclosures in emergency or threatening circumstances, such as the Opioid and COVID-19 public health emergencies; and reducing administrative burdens on HIPAA covered health care providers and health plans, while continuing to protect individuals’ health information privacy interests.
  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has used its powers to compel selected regulated entities to provide requested information in asking that “nine social media and video streaming companies…provide data on how they collect, use, and present personal information, their advertising and user engagement practices, and how their practices affect children and teens.” The TFTC is using its Section 6(b) authority to compel the information from Amazon.com, Inc., ByteDance Ltd., which operates the short video service TikTok, Discord Inc., Facebook, Inc., Reddit, Inc., Snap Inc., Twitter, Inc., WhatsApp Inc., and YouTube LLC. Failure to respond can result in the FTC fining a non-compliant entity.
    • The FTC claimed in its press release it “is seeking information specifically related to:
      • how social media and video streaming services collect, use, track, estimate, or derive personal and demographic information;
      • how they determine which ads and other content are shown to consumers;
      • whether they apply algorithms or data analytics to personal information;
      • how they measure, promote, and research user engagement; and
      • how their practices affect children and teens.
    • The FTC explained in its sample order:
      • The Commission is seeking information concerning the privacy policies, procedures, and practices of Social Media and Video Streaming Service providers, Including the method and manner in which they collect, use, store, and disclose Personal Information about consumers and their devices. The Special Report will assist the Commission in conducting a study of such policies, practices, and procedures.
  • The United States (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) supplemented its Emergency Directive 21-01 to federal civilian agencies in response to the Sluzhba vneshney razvedki Rossiyskoy Federatsii’s (SVR) hack via SolarWinds. In an 18 December update, CISA explained:
    • This section provides additional guidance on the implementation of CISA Emergency Directive (ED) 21-01, to include an update on affected versions, guidance for agencies using third-party service providers, and additional clarity on required actions.
    •  In a 30 December update, CISA stated:
      • Specifically, all federal agencies operating versions of the SolarWinds Orion platform other than those identified as “affected versions” below are required to use at least SolarWinds Orion Platform version 2020.2.1HF2. The National Security Agency (NSA) has examined this version and verified that it eliminates the previously identified malicious code. Given the number and nature of disclosed and undisclosed vulnerabilities in SolarWinds Orion, all instances that remain connected to federal networks must be updated to 2020.2.1 HF2 by COB December 31, 2020. CISA will follow up with additional supplemental guidance, to include further clarifications and hardening requirements.
  • Australia’s Attorney-General’s Department published an unclassified version of the four volumes of the “Report of the Comprehensive Review of the Legal Framework of the National Intelligence Community,” an “examination of the legislative framework underpinning the National Intelligence Community (NIC)…the first and largest since the Hope Royal Commissions considered the Australian Intelligence Community (AIC) in the 1970s and 1980s.” Ultimately, the authors of the report concluded:
    • We do not consider the introduction of a common legislative framework, in the form of a single Act governing all or some NIC agencies, to be a practical, pragmatic or proportionate reform. It would be unlikely that the intended benefits of streamlining and simplifying NIC legislation could be achieved due to the diversity of NIC agency functions—from intelligence to law enforcement, regulatory and policy—and the need to maintain differences in powers, immunities and authorising frameworks. The Review estimates that reform of this scale would cost over $200million and take up to 10years to complete. This would be an impractical and disproportionate undertaking for no substantial gain. In our view, the significant costs and risks of moving to a single, consolidated Act clearly outweigh the limited potential benefits.
    • While not recommending a common legislative framework for the entire NIC, some areas of NIC legislation would benefit from simplification and modernisation. We recommend the repeal of the TIA Act, Surveillance Devices Act 2004(SD Act) and parts of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation Act 1979 (ASIO Act), and their replacement with a single new Act governing the use of electronic surveillance powers—telecommunications interception, covert access to stored communications, computers and telecommunications data, and the use of optical, listening and tracking devices—under Commonwealth law.
  • The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released additional materials to supplement a major rewrite of a foundational security guidance document. NIST explained “[n]ew supplemental materials for NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-53 Revision 5, Security and Privacy Controls for Information Systems and Organizations, are available for download to support the December 10, 2020 errata release of SP 800-53 and SP 800-53B, Control Baselines for Information Systems and Organizations.” These supplemental materials include:
    • A comparison of the NIST SP 800-53 Revision 5 controls and control enhancements to Revision 4. The spreadsheet describes the changes to each control and control enhancement, provides a brief summary of the changes, and includes an assessment of the significance of the changes.  Note that this comparison was authored by The MITRE Corporation for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) and is being shared with permission by DNI.
    • Mapping of the Appendix J Privacy Controls (Revision 4) to Revision 5. The spreadsheet supports organizations using the privacy controls in Appendix J of SP 800-53 Revision 4 that are transitioning to the integrated control catalog in Revision 5.
    • Mappings between NIST SP 800-53 and other frameworks and standards. The mappings provide organizations a general indication of SP 800-53 control coverage with respect to other frameworks and standards. When leveraging the mappings, it is important to consider the intended scope of each publication and how each publication is used; organizations should not assume equivalency based solely on the mapping tables because mappings are not always one-to-one and there is a degree of subjectivity in the mapping analysis.
  • Via a final rule, the Department of Defense (DOD) codified “the National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) in regulation…[that] establishes requirements for the protection of classified information disclosed to or developed by contractors, licensees, grantees, or certificate holders (hereinafter referred to as contractors) to prevent unauthorized disclosure.” The DOD stated “[i]n addition to adding the NISPOM to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this rule incorporates the requirements of Security Executive Agent Directive (SEAD) 3, “Reporting Requirements for Personnel with Access to Classified Information or Who Hold a Sensitive Position.” The DOD stated “SEAD 3 requires reporting by all contractor cleared personnel who have been granted eligibility for access to classified information.”
    • The DOD added “[t]his NISPOM rule provides for a single nation-wide implementation plan which will, with this rule, include SEAD 3 reporting by all contractor cleared personnel to report specific activities that may adversely impact their continued national security eligibility, such as reporting of foreign travel and foreign contacts.”
    • The DOD explained “NISP Cognizant Security Agencies (CSAs) shall conduct an analysis of such reported activities to determine whether they pose a potential threat to national security and take appropriate action.”
    • The DOD added that “the rule also implements the provisions of Section 842 of Public Law 115-232, which removes the requirement for a covered National Technology and Industrial Base (NTIB) entity operating under a special security agreement pursuant to the NISP to obtain a national interest determination as a condition for access to proscribed information.”
  • An advisory committee housed at the United States (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is calling for the White House to quickly “operationalize intelligence in a classified space with senior executives and cyber experts from most critical entities in the energy, financial services, and communications sectors working directly with intelligence analysts and other government staff.” In their report, the President’s National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) proposed the creation of a Critical Infrastructure Command Center (CICC) to “provid[e] real-time collaboration between government and industry…[and] take direct action and provide tactical solutions to mitigate, remediate,  and deter threats.” NIAC urged the President to “direct relevant federal agencies to support the private sector in executing the concept, including identifying the required government staff…[and] work with Congress to ensure the appropriate authorities are established to allow the CICC to fully realize its operational functionality.” NIAC recommended “near-term actions to implement the CICC concept:
    • 1.The President should direct the relevant federal agencies to support the private sector in rapidly standing up the CICC concept with the energy, financial services, and communications sectors:
      • a. Within 90 days the private sector will identify the executives who will lead execution of the CICC concept and establish governing criteria (including membership, staffing and rotation, and other logistics).
      • b. Within 120 days the CICC sector executives will identify and assign the necessary CICC staff from the private sector.
      • c. Within 90 days an appropriate venue to house the operational component will be identified and the necessary agreements put in place.
    • 2. The President should direct the Intelligence Community and other relevant government agencies to identify and co-locate the required government staff counterparts to enable the direct coordination required by the CICC. This staff should be pulled from the IC, SSAs, and law enforcement.
    • 3. The President, working with Congress, should establish the appropriate authorities and mission for federal agencies to directly share intelligence with critical infrastructure companies, along with any other authorities required for the CICC concept to be fully successful (identified in Appendix A).
    • 4. Once the CICC concept is fully operational (within 180 days), the responsible executives should deliver a report to the NSC and the NIAC demonstrating how the distinct capabilities of the CICC have been achieved and the impact of the capabilities to date. The report should identify remaining gaps in resources, direction, or authorities.

Coming Events

  • On 13 January, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold its monthly open meeting, and the agency has placed the following items on its tentative agenda “Bureau, Office, and Task Force leaders will summarize the work their teams have done over the last four years in a series of presentations:
    • Panel One. The Commission will hear presentations from the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, International Bureau, Office of Engineering and Technology, and Office of Economics and Analytics.
    • Panel Two. The Commission will hear presentations from the Wireline Competition Bureau and the Rural Broadband Auctions Task Force.
    • Panel Three. The Commission will hear presentations from the Media Bureau and the Incentive Auction Task Force.
    • Panel Four. The Commission will hear presentations from the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, Enforcement Bureau, and Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.
    • Panel Five. The Commission will hear presentations from the Office of Communications Business Opportunities, Office of Managing Director, and Office of General Counsel.
  • On 27 July, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold PrivacyCon 2021.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2021. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by opsa from Pixabay

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