Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events (16 September)

Coming Events

  • The United States’ Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) announced that its third annual National Cybersecurity Summit “will be held virtually as a series of webinars every Wednesday for four weeks beginning September 16 and ending October 7:”
    • September 16: Key Cyber Insights
    • September 23: Leading the Digital Transformation
    • September 30: Diversity in Cybersecurity
    • October 7: Defending our Democracy
    • One can register for the event here.
  • The House Homeland Security Committee will hold a hearing titled “Worldwide Threats to the Homeland” on 17 September with the following witnesses:
    • Chad Wolf, Department of Homeland Security
    • Christopher Wray, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation
    • Christopher Miller, Director, National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)
  • On 17 September, the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Communications & technology Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled “Trump FCC: Four Years of Lost Opportunities.”
  • The House Armed Services Committee’s Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee will hold a hearing’ titled “Interim Review of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence Effort and Recommendations” on 17 September with these witnesses:
    • Dr. Eric Schmidt , Chairman, National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence 
    • HON Robert Work, Vice Chairman, National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, HON Mignon Clyburn, Commissioner, National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence 
    • Dr. José-Marie Griffiths, Commissioner, National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence
  • On 22 September, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold a public workshop “to examine the potential benefits and challenges to consumers and competition raised by data portability.” The agency has released its agenda and explained:
    • The workshop will also feature four panel discussions that will focus on: case studies on data portability rights in the European Union, India, and California; case studies on financial and health portability regimes; reconciling the benefits and risks of data portability; and the material challenges and solutions to realizing data portability’s potential.
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Intellectual Property Subcommittee will hold a hearing “Examining Threats to American Intellectual Property: Cyber-attacks and Counterfeits During the COVID-19 Pandemic” with these witnesses:
    • Adam Hickey, Deputy Assistant Attorney General National Security Division, Department of Justice
    • Clyde Wallace, Deputy Assistant Director Cyber Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation
    • Steve Francis, Assistant Director, HSI Global Trade Investigations Division Director, National Intellectual Property Rights Center, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security
    • Bryan S. Ware, Assistant Director for Cybersecurity Cyber Security and Infrastructure Security Agency, Department of Homeland Security
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Antitrust, Competition Policy & Consumer Rights Subcommittee will hold a hearing on 30 September titled “Oversight of the Enforcement of the Antitrust Laws” with Federal Trade Commission Chair Joseph Simons and United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division Assistant Attorney General Makan Delhrahim.
  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold an open meeting on 30 September and has made available its agenda with these items:
    • Facilitating Shared Use in the 3.1-3.55 GHz Band. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would remove the existing non-federal allocations from the 3.3-3.55 GHz band as an important step toward making 100 megahertz of spectrum in the 3.45-3.55 GHz band available for commercial use, including 5G, throughout the contiguous United States. The Commission will also consider a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would propose to add a co-primary, non-federal fixed and mobile (except aeronautical mobile) allocation to the 3.45-3.55 GHz band as well as service, technical, and competitive bidding rules for flexible-use licenses in the band. (WT Docket No. 19-348)
    • Expanding Access to and Investment in the 4.9 GHz Band. The Commission will consider a Sixth Report and Order that would expand access to and investment in the 4.9 GHz (4940-4990 MHz) band by providing states the opportunity to lease this spectrum to commercial entities, electric utilities, and others for both public safety and non-public safety purposes. The Commission also will consider a Seventh Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would propose a new set of licensing rules and seek comment on ways to further facilitate access to and investment in the band. (WP Docket No. 07-100)
    • Improving Transparency and Timeliness of Foreign Ownership Review Process. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would improve the timeliness and transparency of the process by which it seeks the views of Executive Branch agencies on any national security, law enforcement, foreign policy, and trade policy concerns related to certain applications filed with the Commission. (IB Docket No. 16-155)
    • Promoting Caller ID Authentication to Combat Spoofed Robocalls. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would continue its work to implement the TRACED Act and promote the deployment of caller ID authentication technology to combat spoofed robocalls. (WC Docket No. 17-97)
    • Combating 911 Fee Diversion. The Commission will consider a Notice of Inquiry that would seek comment on ways to dissuade states and territories from diverting fees collected for 911 to other purposes. (PS Docket Nos. 20-291, 09-14)
    • Modernizing Cable Service Change Notifications. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would modernize requirements for notices cable operators must provide subscribers and local franchising authorities. (MB Docket Nos. 19-347, 17-105)
    • Eliminating Records Requirements for Cable Operator Interests in Video Programming. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would eliminate the requirement that cable operators maintain records in their online public inspection files regarding the nature and extent of their attributable interests in video programming services. (MB Docket No. 20-35, 17-105)
    • Reforming IP Captioned Telephone Service Rates and Service Standards. The Commission will consider a Report and Order, Order on Reconsideration, and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would set compensation rates for Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service (IP CTS), deny reconsideration of previously set IP CTS compensation rates, and propose service quality and performance measurement standards for captioned telephone services. (CG Docket Nos. 13-24, 03-123)
    • Enforcement Item. The Commission will consider an enforcement action.

Other Developments

  • The United States House of Representatives took up and passed two technology bills on 14 September. One of the bills, “Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2020” (H.R. 1668), was discussed in yesterday’s Technology Policy Update as part of an outlook on Internet of Things (IoT) legislation (see here for analysis). The House passed a revised version by voice vote, but its fate in the Senate may lie with the Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee, whose chair, Senator Ron Johnson (R-WI), has blocked a number of technology bills during his tenure to the chagrin of some House stakeholders. The House also passed the “AI in Government Act of 2019” (H.R.2575) that would establish an AI Center of Excellence within the General Services Administration that would
    • “(1) advise and promote the efforts of the Federal Government in developing innovative uses of artificial intelligence by the Federal Government to the benefit of the public; and
    • (2) improve cohesion and competency in the use of artificial intelligence.”
    • Also, this bill would direct the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to “issue a memorandum to the head of each agency that shall—
      • inform the development of artificial intelligence governance approaches by those agencies regarding technologies and applications that—
        • are empowered or enabled by the use of artificial intelligence within that agency; and
        • advance the innovative use of artificial intelligence for the benefit of the public while upholding civil liberties, privacy, and civil rights;
      • consider ways to reduce barriers to the use of artificial intelligence in order to promote innovative application of those technologies for the benefit of the public, while protecting civil liberties, privacy, and civil rights;
      • establish best practices for identifying, assessing, and mitigating any bias on the basis of any classification protected under Federal nondiscrimination laws or other negative unintended consequence stemming from the use of artificial intelligence systems; and
      • provide a template of the required contents of the agency Governance Plans
    • The House Energy and Commerce Committee marked up and reported out more than 30 bills last week including:
      • The “Consumer Product Safety Inspection Enhancement Act” (H.R. 8134) that “would amend the Consumer Product Safety Act to enhance the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) ability to identify unsafe consumer products entering the United States, especially e-commerce shipments entering under the de minimis value exemption. Specifically, the bill would require the CPSC to enhance the targeting, surveillance, and screening of consumer products. The bill also would require electronic filing of certificates of compliance for all consumer products entering the United States.
      • The bill directs the CPSC to: 1) examine a sampling of de minimis shipments and shipments coming from China; 2) detail plans and timelines to effectively address targeting and screening of de minimis shipments; 3) establish metrics by which to evaluate the effectiveness of the CPSC’s efforts in this regard; 4) assess projected technology, resources, and staffing necessary; and 5) submit a report to Congress regarding such efforts. The bill further directs the CPSC to hire at least 16 employees every year until staffing needs are met to help identify violative products at ports.
      • The “AI for Consumer Product Safety Act” (H.R. 8128) that “would direct the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to establish a pilot program to explore the use of artificial intelligence for at least one of the following purposes: 1) tracking injury trends; 2) identifying consumer product hazards; 3) monitoring the retail marketplace for the sale of recalled consumer products; or 4) identifying unsafe imported consumer products.” The revised bill passed by the committee “changes the title of the bill to the “Consumer Safety Technology Act”, and adds the text based on the Blockchain Innovation Act (H.R. 8153) and the Digital Taxonomy Act (H.R. 2154)…[and] adds sections that direct the Department of Commerce (DOC), in consultation with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), to conduct a study and submit to Congress a report on the state of blockchain technology in commerce, including its use to reduce fraud and increase security.” The revised bill “would also require the FTC to submit to Congress a report and recommendations on unfair or deceptive acts or practices relating to digital tokens.”
      • The “American Competitiveness Of a More Productive Emerging Tech Economy Act” or the “American COMPETE Act” (H.R. 8132) “directs the DOC and the FTC to study and report to Congress on the state of the artificial intelligence, quantum computing, blockchain, and the new and advanced materials industries in the U.S…[and] would also require the DOC to study and report to Congress on the state of the Internet of Things (IoT) and IoT manufacturing industries as well as the three-dimensional printing industry” involving “among other things:1) listing industry sectors that develop and use each technology and public-private partnerships focused on promoting the adoption and use of each such technology; 2) establishing a list of federal agencies asserting jurisdiction over such industry sectors; and 3) assessing risks and trends in the marketplace and supply chain of each technology.
      • The bill would direct the DOC to study and report on the effect of unmanned delivery services on U.S. businesses conducting interstate commerce. In addition to these report elements, the bill would require the DOC to examine safety risks and effects on traffic congestion and jobs of unmanned delivery services.
      • Finally, the bill would require the FTC to study and report to Congress on how artificial intelligence may be used to address online harms, including scams directed at senior citizens, disinformation or exploitative content, and content furthering illegal activity.
  • The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued NIST Interagency or Internal Report 8272 “Impact Analysis Tool for Interdependent Cyber Supply Chain Risks” designed to help public and private sector entities better address complicated, complex supply chain risks. NIST stated “[t]his publication de-scribes how to use the Cyber Supply Chain Risk Management (C-SCRM) Interdependency Tool that has been developed to help federal agencies identify and assess the potential impact of cybersecurity events in their interconnected supply chains.” NIST explained
    • More organizations are becoming aware of the importance of identifying cybersecurity risks associated with extensive, complicated supply chains. Several solutions have been developed to help manage supply chains; most focus on contract management or compliance. There is a need to provide organizations with a systematic and more usable way to evaluate the potential impacts of cyber supply chain risks relative to an organization’s risk appetite. This is especially important for organizations with complex supply chains and highly interdependent products and suppliers.
    • This publication describes one potential way to visualize and measure these impacts: a Cyber Supply Chain Risk Management (C-SCRM) Interdependency Tool (hereafter “Tool”), which is designed to provide a basic measurement of the potential impact of a cyber supply chain event. The Tool is not intended to measure the risk of an event, where risk is defined as a function of threat, vulnerability, likelihood, and impact. Research conducted by the authors of this publication found that, at the time of publication, existing cybersecurity risk tools and research focused on threats, vulnerabilities, and likelihood, but impact was frequently overlooked. Thus, this Tool is intended to bridge that gap and enable users and tool developers to create a more complete understanding of an organization’s risk by measuring impact in their specific environments.
    • The Tool also provides the user greater visibility over the supply chain and the relative importance of particular projects, products, and suppliers (hereafter referred to as “nodes”) compared to others. This can be determined by examining the metrics that contribute to a node’s importance, such as the amount of access a node has to the acquiring organization’s IT network, physical facilities, and data. By understanding which nodes are the most important in their organization’s supply chain, the user can begin to understand the potential impact a disruption of that node may cause on business operations. The user can then prioritize the completion of risk mitigating actions to reduce the impact a disruption would cause to the organization’s supply chain and overall business.
  • In a blog post, Microsoft released its findings on the escalating threats to political campaigns and figures during the run up to the United States’ (U.S.) election. This warning also served as an advertisement for Microsoft’s security products. But, be that as it may, these findings echo what U.S. security services have been saying for months. Microsoft stated
    • In recent weeks, Microsoft has detected cyberattacks targeting people and organizations involved in the upcoming presidential election, including unsuccessful attacks on people associated with both the Trump and Biden campaigns, as detailed below. We have and will continue to defend our democracy against these attacks through notifications of such activity to impacted customers, security features in our products and services, and legal and technical disruptions. The activity we are announcing today makes clear that foreign activity groups have stepped up their efforts targeting the 2020 election as had been anticipated, and is consistent with what the U.S. government and others have reported. We also report here on attacks against other institutions and enterprises worldwide that reflect similar adversary activity.
    • We have observed that:
      • Strontium, operating from Russia, has attacked more than 200 organizations including political campaigns, advocacy groups, parties and political consultants
      • Zirconium, operating from China, has attacked high-profile individuals associated with the election, including people associated with the Joe Biden for President campaign and prominent leaders in the international affairs community
      • Phosphorus, operating from Iran, has continued to attack the personal accounts of people associated with the Donald J. Trump for President campaign
    • The majority of these attacks were detected and stopped by security tools built into our products. We have directly notified those who were targeted or compromised so they can take action to protect themselves. We are sharing more about the details of these attacks today, and where we’ve named impacted customers, we’re doing so with their support.
    • What we’ve seen is consistent with previous attack patterns that not only target candidates and campaign staffers but also those they consult on key issues. These activities highlight the need for people and organizations involved in the political process to take advantage of free and low-cost security tools to protect themselves as we get closer to election day. At Microsoft, for example, we offer AccountGuard threat monitoring, Microsoft 365 for Campaigns and Election Security Advisors to help secure campaigns and their volunteers. More broadly, these attacks underscore the continued importance of work underway at the United Nations to protect cyberspace and initiatives like the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace.
  • The European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) has reiterated and expanded upon his calls for caution, prudence, and adherence to European Union (EU) law and principles in the use of artificial intelligence, especially as the EU looks to revamp its approach to AI and data protection. In a blog post, EDPS Wojciech Wiewiórowski stated:
    • The expectations of the increasing use of AI and the related economic advantages for those who control the technologies, as well as its appetite for data, have given rise to fierce competition about technological leadership. In this competition, the EU strives to be a frontrunner while staying true to its own values and ideals.
    • AI comes with its own risks and is not an innocuous, magical tool, which will heal the world harmlessly. For example, the rapid adoption of AI by public administrations in hospitals, utilities and transport services, financial supervisors, and other areas of public interest is considered in the EC White Paper ‘essential’, but we believe that prudency is needed. AI, like any other technology, is a mere tool, and should be designed to serve humankind. Benefits, costs and risks should be considered by anyone adopting a technology, especially by public administrations who process great amounts of personal data.
    • The increase in adoption of AI has not been (yet?) accompanied by a proper assessment of what the impact on individuals and on our society as a whole will likely be. Think especially of live facial recognition (remote biometric identification in the EC White Paper). We support the idea of a moratorium on automated recognition in public spaces of human features in the EU, of faces but also and importantly of gait, fingerprints, DNA, voice, keystrokes and other biometric or behavioural signals.
    • Let’s not rush AI, we have to get it straight so that it is fair and that it serves individuals and society at large.
    • The context in which the consultation for the Data Strategy was conducted gave a prominent place to the role of data in matters of public interest, including combating the virus. This is good and right as the GDPR was crafted so that the processing of personal data should serve humankind. There are existing conditions under which such “processing for the public good” could already take place, and without which the necessary trust of data subjects would not be possible.
    • However, there is a substantial persuasive power in the narratives nudging individuals to ‘volunteer’ their data to address highly moral goals. Concepts such as ‘Data altruism”, or ‘Data donation” and their added value are not entirely clear and there is a need to better define and lay down their scope, and possible purposes, for instance, in the context of scientific research in the health sector. The fundamental right to the protection of personal data cannot be ‘waived’ by the individual concerned, be it through a ‘donation’ or through a ‘sale’ of personal data. The data controller is fully bound by the personal data rules and principles, such as purpose limitation even when processing data that have been ‘donated’ i.e. when consent to the processing had been given by the individual.

Further Reading

  • Peter Thiel Met With The Racist Fringe As He Went All In On Trump” By Rosie Gray and Ryan Mac — BuzzFeed News. A fascinating article about one of the technology world’s more interesting figures. As part of his decision to ally himself with Donald Trump when running for president, Peter Thiel also met with avowed white supremacists. However, it appears that the alliance is no longer worthy of his financial assistance or his public support as he supposedly was disturbed about the Administration’s response to the pandemic. However, Palantir, his company has flourished during the Trump Administration and may be going public right before matters may change under a Biden Administration.
  • TikTok’s Proposed Deal Seeks to Mollify U.S. and China” By David McCabe, Ana Swanson and Erin Griffith — The New York Times. ByteDance is apparently trying to mollify both Washington and Beijing in bringing Oracle onboard as “trusted technology partner,” for the arrangement may be acceptable to both nations under their export control and national security regimes. Oracle handling and safeguarding TikTokj user data would seem to address the Trump Administration’s concerns, but not selling the company nor permitting Oracle to access its algorithm for making recommendations would seem to appease the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Moreover, United States (U.S.) investors would hold control over TikTok even though PRC investors would maintain their stakes. Such an arrangement may satisfy the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which has ordered ByteDance to sell the app that is an integral part of TikTok. The wild card, as always, is where President Donald Trump ultimately comes out on the deal.
  • Oracle’s courting of Trump may help it land TikTok’s business and coveted user data” By Jay Greene and Ellen Nakashima — The Washington Post. This piece dives into why Oracle, at first blush, seems like an unlikely suitor to TikTok, but it’s eroding business position visa vis cloud companies like Amazon explains its desire to diversify. Also, Oracle’s role as a data broker makes all the user data available from TikTok very attractive.
  • Chinese firm harvests social media posts, data of prominent Americans and military” By Gerry Shih — The Washington Post. Another view on Shenzhen Zhenhua Data Technology, the entity from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) exposed for collecting the personal data of more than 2.4 million westerners, many of whom hold positions of power and influence. This article quotes a number of experts allowed to look at what was leaked of the data base who are of the view the PRC has very little in the way of actionable intelligence, at this point. The country is leveraging publicly available big data from a variety of sources and may ultimately makes something useful from these data.
  • “‘This is f—ing crazy’: Florida Latinos swamped by wild conspiracy theories” By Sabrina Rodriguez and Marc Caputo — Politico. A number of sources are spreading rumors about former Vice President Joe Biden and the Democrats generally in order to curb support among a key demographic the party will need to carry overwhelmingly to win Florida.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo by Alexander Sinn on Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s