Questionable Hunter Biden Article Blocked; Republicans Claim Bias

After social media platforms decline to allow the unfettered distribution of an article planted by Trump associates, Republicans increase their rage towards these companies.

Last week, at first, both Twitter and Facebook blocked their users from posting a very questionable New York Post article about the allegedly illegal and unethical business dealings of former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden. Given that the genesis of the email and other communications on which the “story” is allegedly based are dubious in the extreme and reportedly come from the very ethically challenged Rudy Giuliani (especially in light of the clip from the new Borat movie) and Steve Bannon (currently under indictment for fraud), I won’t be linking to what is likely a Russian and/or Trump Campaign attempt to smear the Bidens. However, Facebook and Twitter restricted the posting and reposting this article has enraged many Republicans even further on the subject of alleged but unproven bias against conservatives.

Twitter stopped people from posting a link or a photo of the article, and when people tried, this warning came up: “[w]e can’t complete this request because this link has been identified by Twitter or our partners as being potentially harmful.” However, Twitter later reversed itself. CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted “[s]traight blocking of URLs was wrong, and we updated our policy and enforcement to fix…[and] [o]ur goal is to attempt to add context, and now we have capabilities to do that.” So, Twitter relented and allowed a related New York Post article on Hunter Biden’s alleged dealings in Ukraine to be posted but not the one pertaining to his alleged China dealings. Twitter also changed its policy after initially claiming it was blocking the story because it was hacked material that violated its Hacked Materials Policy. A Twitter official explained how its Hacked Materials Policy would be changed:

1. We will no longer remove hacked content unless it is directly shared by hackers or those acting in concert with them

2. We will label Tweets to provide context instead of blocking links from being shared on Twitter

Facebook took a slightly different approach. This social media platform restricted linking to the article, explaining it was still being fact checked. Facebook’s director of communications explained the platform’s approach in a string of tweets.

Yesterday, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to issue subpoenas to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey “to  testify  before  the  Committee  regarding  (1)  the suppression and/or censorship of two news articles from the New York Post titled “Smoking-gun email reveals how Hunter Biden introduced Ukrainian businessman to VP dad” and “Emails reveal how Hunter Biden tried to cash in big on behalf of family with Chinese firm,” (2) any other content-moderation  policies,  practices, or  actions  that  may  interfere  with  or influence   elections   for   federal   office,   and   (3)   any   other   recent determinations to temporarily reduce distribution of material pending fact-checker review and/or block and mark material as potentially unsafe.” Given the centrality of the false narrative that social media and technology companies are biased against conservatives, especially in relation to content moderation, it is no surprise that this committee decided to issue subpoenas. Firstly, Chair Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is fighting for his political life given that the much stronger than expected challenge he has faced for reelection. Secondly, two of the more vocal Republicans who have called out Facebook and Twitter serve on the committee (see below). And, thirdly, Graham has been keen to ensure his committee maintains its role on technology issues and is not eclipsed by the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, which is holding a hearing on Section 230 at month’s end with Dorsey, Zuckerberg, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

After the Senate Judiciary Committee’s vote, top Republicans on the House committee of jurisdiction called on the Democratic majority to hold a hearing with technology CEOs. House Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Greg Walden (R-OR), Communications and Technology Subcommittee Ranking Member Bob Latta (R-OH), and Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee Ranking Member Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) urged Chair Frank Pallone Jr (D-NJ) “to join with us to protect the integrity of our elections and stop the censorship of political speech.” They asserted “[i]t’s long past time for the Energy and Commerce Committee to compel the testimony of the CEOs of the powerful tech platforms.” This statement follows a letter earlier in the week from Walden, Latta, McMorris Rodgers and other Republicans to Pallone “to request the Committee hold a hearing on social media censorship and its deleterious effects and that you issue invitations to the CEOs of Twitter, Facebook and Google to testify.” They argued “[i]n the event these companies refuse an invitation to testify we request the Committee expeditiously hold a business meeting to authorize subpoenas to the CEOs of Twitter, Facebook and Google to compel their testimony before the Energy and Commerce Committee.”

However, Pallone seems unlikely to comply given the tenor of the joint statement he issued with Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chair Mike Doyle (D-PA) on Federal Communications Commission Chair Ajit Pai’s announcement that the agency will move forward on a Section 230 rulemaking. Pallone and Doyle remarked:

  • Chairman Pai’s decision to start a Section 230 rulemaking is a blatant attempt to help a flailing President Trump. The timing and hurried nature of this decision makes clear it’s being done to influence social media companies’ behavior leading up to an election, and it is shocking to watch this supposedly independent regulatory agency jump at the opportunity to become a political appendage of President Trump’s campaign.
  • From the start, Republicans have used the Section 230 debate to threaten social media companies when they remove or flag disinformation and extremism on their platforms – all because of some baseless fantasy grievance that the internet is biased against conservative views. Their approach translates into a defense of online extremism and foreign countries’ disinformation campaigns, which is a baffling and dangerous position for lawmakers to take.

Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) claimed in a letter to the Federal Election Commission (FEC) that Twitter and Facebook have given the Biden Campaign an in-kind contribution by blocking the article in violation of federal campaign finance law. Hawley, however, was careful to couch his language in language suggesting that Twitter and Facebook’s actions (which he terms suppression) were in-kind contributions instead of outright asserting they are. The reason for this is that Hawley’s legal reasoning is, shall we say, novel.

While Hawley quite accurately quotes the law on what constitutes a contribution (“[a] “contribution” includes “anything of value . . . for the purpose of influencing any election for Federal office”), he is apparently unaware of the regulations promulgated by the FEC to explicate gaps and unaddressed issues in the statute. FEC regulations shed further light on the issue at hand. Notably, in 11 CFR 100.71, the FEC’s regulations provide extensive exceptions to what is a contribution and provide “[t]he term contribution does not include payments, services or other things of value described in this subpart.” One such exception is found in 11 CFR 100.73, “News story, commentary, or editorial by the media,” which makes clear:

Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by any broadcasting station (including a cable television operator, programmer or producer), Web site, newspaper, magazine, or other periodical publication, including any Internet or electronic publication, is not a contribution unless the facility is owned or controlled by any political party, political committee, or candidate, in which case the costs for a news story.

One of the essential elements for such an action to be a contribution is control or ownership. I am fairly certain the Biden Campaign neither owns nor controls Twitter or Facebook. For if they do, they have been colossally inept in allowing President Donald Trump and his partisans to spread widely misinformation and lies about mail-in voting to name one such subject.

Moreover, the FEC and federal courts have long recognized the “press exemption” to what might otherwise be considered in-kind contributions or expenditures in violation of the law. This exemption includes websites and the internet. It would seem that Facebook and Twitter were acting in ways much more similar to how the traditional print media has. It is telling that Hawley and others have not pilloried the so-called liberal media for looking askance at the New York Post’s story and not taking it at face value to the extent they have covered it at all. Therefore, it seems like any value the Biden Campaign may have derived from social media platforms using 47 USC 230 in moderating content on their platform is not an in-kind contribution.

Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) also wrote Twitter and Facebook, accusing the platforms of “‘obvious and transparent attempt’ to influence the November election.” Cruz called the decisions “hypocritical” considering the platforms decisions to allow users to share less well-sourced stories. Cruz argued:

  • Twitter has apparently decided to preemptively censor this report. Twitter is not only prohibiting users from sharing this story on their own accounts, it is prohibiting the New York Post itself from posting its own content. Twitter well-knows its incredible ability to influence public dialogue by promoting some stories while suppressing others, and it has plainly decided that the American people should not be seeing or discussing this particular story, which could significantly influence voters’ views of candidate Biden.
  • Facebook apparently decided, almost immediately upon the article’s publication, to preemptively and affirmatively reduce dissemination of this reporting. As the company has already, publicly stated, it has “reduc[ed] its distribution on our platform.” The company made clear that, nevertheless, “this story is eligible to be fact checked by Facebook’s third-party fact checking partners.” It would appear, then, that the decision was made to limit the reach of the New York Post reporting before any determination had been made, in the first instance, about its factual accuracy.

This is fairly standard Republican rhetoric on social media platforms that will undoubtedly be in full effect when the Senate Judiciary Committee convenes with Dorsey and Zuckerberg.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by Gerhard G. from Pixabay

Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events (15 October)

Further Reading

  •  “Amazon to escape UK digital services tax that will hit smaller traders” By Mark Sweney — The Guardian. According to media reports, the United Kingdom’s (UK) new digital services tax will not be levied on goods Amazon sells directly to consumers. Rather, the new tax HM Revenue and Customs will be on the revenue from services Amazon and other platforms charge to third-party sellers using Amazon. And, Amazon has made clear it will merely pass along the 2% tax to these entities. This is a strange outcome to a policy ostensibly designed to address the fact that the tach giant paid only £14.4 million in corporation taxes to the UK last year on £13.7 billion in revenue.
  • Norway blames Russia for cyber-attack on parliament” — BBC News. In a statement, the Norwegian government claimed that its Parliament has been breached, and Norway’s Foreign Minister is saying the Russian Federation is the culprit. Last month the government in Oslo said that the email accounts of some government officials had been compromised, but this announcement seems to indicate the breach was far wider than thought last month, or that the government knew and was holding back the information. If true, this is the second such penetration and exfiltration by Russian security services of a European government in the recent past as the German government made the same claims, which lead to the European Union’s first cyber sanctions.
  • Twitter suspends accounts for posing as Black Trump supporters” By Kari Paul — The Guardian and “Fake Twitter accounts posing as Black Trump supporters appear, reach thousands, then vanish” By Craig Timberg and Isaac Stanley-Becker — The Washington Post. As a rule of thumb, I find the Cui Bono helpful. And, so it is with fake Twitter accounts of alleged African Americans who will vote for President Donald Trump. Are these courtesy of the Republican Party and the Trump Campaign? Maybe. They would certainly gain from peeling off African American support for Vice President Joe Biden considering its his strongest constituency as measured by percentage support relative to total population. The Russians? Sure. They also stand to benefit from stirring the cauldron of unease and division in the United States regardless of who wins, and possibly even more so if Biden wins for the U.S. will likely return to its pre-Trump adversarial policy towards the Russian Federation. And, finally how does Twitter benefit from taking down the sort of fake accounts that violate its terms of service when this has not often been its modus operandi? Perhaps to curry favor with a Biden Administration likely to push for changes as to how social media platforms are to be regulated.
  • Backers of Australia’s mandatory news code welcome French ruling on Google” By Amanda Meade — The Guardian. Not surprisingly, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) was delighted when a French appeals court ruled in favor of France’s competition authority against Google in its challenge of a French law to require social media platforms to pay traditional media for use of their content. The ACCC has been fighting its own battle on this front with its draft code that would require Google and Facebook to do the same down under.
  • Can Tinder be sued for breach of care?” By James Purtrill — ABC News. Given the recent allegations that Tinder knew of sexual assaulters using their app and doing nothing, this piece looks at the liability Tinder may face under Australian law. It is quite likely if sexual assaults related to Tinder indifference or negligence is occurring in other common law countries, then the company may be facing lawsuits there, too.

Other Developments

  • The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not all it can on aviation cybersecurity despite the absence of any successful cyber attacks on a plane’s avionics system. The GAO asserted:
    • FAA has not (1) assessed its oversight program to determine the priority of avionics cybersecurity risks, (2) developed an avionics cybersecurity training program, (3) issued guidance for independent cybersecurity testing, or (4) included periodic testing as part of its monitoring process. Until FAA strengthens its oversight program, based on assessed risks, it may not be able to ensure it is providing sufficient oversight to guard against evolving cybersecurity risks facing avionics systems in commercial airplanes.
    • The GAO allowed:
      • Increasing use of technology and connectivity in avionics has brought new opportunities for persons with malicious intentions to target commercial transport airplanes. The connections among avionics and other systems onboard airplanes and throughout the aviation ecosystem are growing more complex as airplanes become more connected to systems that are essential for flight safety and operations. Airframe manufacturers are deploying software and hardware protections to reduce the risk of the cyber threats currently facing avionics systems.
    • The GAO contended:
      • Further, while FAA has mechanisms for coordinating among its internal components and with other federal agencies and private sector stakeholders to address cybersecurity risks, it has not established avionics cybersecurity risks as a priority. As a result, avionics cybersecurity issues that have been raised within FAA have not been consistently tracked to resolution. Until FAA conducts an overall assessment of the cybersecurity risks to avionics systems and prioritizes coordination efforts based on that assessment, it may not be allocating resources and coordinating on risks as effectively as it could.
    • The GAO made this recommendations:
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety to conduct a risk assessment of avionics systems cybersecurity to identify the relative priority of avionics cybersecurity risks for its oversight program compared to other safety concerns and develop a plan to address those risks. (Recommendation 1)
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, based on the assessment of avionics cybersecurity risks, to identify staffing and training needs for agency inspectors specific to avionics cybersecurity, and develop and implement appropriate training to address identified needs. (Recommendation 2)
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, based on the assessment of avionics cybersecurity risks, to develop and implement guidance for avionics cybersecurity testing of new airplane designs that includes independent testing. (Recommendation 3)
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, based on the assessment of avionics cybersecurity risks, to review and consider revising its policies and procedures for monitoring the effectiveness of avionics cybersecurity controls in the deployed fleet to include developing procedures for safely conducting independent testing. (Recommendation 4)
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety to develop a mechanism to ensure that avionics cybersecurity issues are appropriately tracked and resolved when coordinating among internal stakeholders. (Recommendation 5)
      • The FAA Administrator should direct the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, based on the assessment of avionics cybersecurity risks, to review and consider the extent to which oversight resources should be committed to avionics cybersecurity. (Recommendation 6)
  • The chairs and ranking members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and one of its subcommittee wrote the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to “evaluate Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) [cyber] incident response capabilities…[and] should include assessing the agency’s forensic threat intelligence data infrastructure used in responding to major or significant incidents involving persistent threats and data breaches.” Chair Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ), Ranking Member Greg Walden (R-OR), and Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Chair Diana DeGette (D-CO), and Ranking Member Brett Guthrie (R-KY) stated:
    • The Chief Information Security Officer at HHS recently acknowledged that the ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis has placed a new target on HHS, and malicious actors have boosted their efforts to infiltrate the agency and access sensitive data. In addition, it was reported in March 2020 that HHS suffered a cyber-attack on its computer system. According to people familiar with the incident, it was part of a campaign of disruption and disinformation that was aimed at undermining the response to the coronavirus pandemic and may have been the work of a foreign actor. Further, emerging cyber threats, such as the advanced persistent threat groups that exploited COVID-19 in early 2020, underscore the importance of effectively protecting information systems supporting the agency.
    • Given the types of information created, stored, and shared on the information systems owned and operated by HHS, it is important that the agency implement effective incident response handling processes and procedures to address persistent cyber-based threats.
  • A federal court denied Epic Games’ request for a preliminary injunction requiring Apple to put Fortnite back into the App Store. The judge assigned the case had signaled this request would likely fail as its request for a temporary restraining order was also rejected. The United States District Court for the Northern District of California summarized Epic’s motion:
    • In this motion for preliminary injunction, Epic Games asks the Court to force Apple to reinstate Fortnite to the Apple App Store, despite its acknowledged breach of its licensing agreements and operating guidelines, and to stop Apple from terminating its affiliates’ access to developer tools for other applications, including Unreal Engine, while Epic Games litigates its claims.
    • The court stated:
      • Epic Games bears the burden in asking for such extraordinary relief. Given the novelty and the magnitude of the issues, as well as the debate in both the academic community and society at large, the Court is unwilling to tilt the playing field in favor of one party or the other with an early ruling of likelihood of success on the merits. Epic Games has strong arguments regarding Apple’s exclusive distribution through the iOS App Store, and the in-app purchase (“IAP”) system through which Apple takes 30% of certain IAP payments. However, given the limited record, Epic Games has not sufficiently addressed Apple’s counter arguments. The equities, addressed in the temporary restraining order, remain the same.
    • The court held:
      • Apple and all persons in active concert or participation with Apple, are preliminarily enjoined from taking adverse action against the Epic Affiliates with respect to restricting, suspending or terminating the Epic Affiliates from the Apple’s Developer Program, on the basis that Epic Games enabled IAP direct processing in Fortnite through means other than the Apple IAP system, or on the basis of the steps Epic Games took to do so. This preliminary injunction shall remain in effect during the pendency of this litigation unless the Epic Affiliates breach: (1) any of their governing agreements with Apple, or (2) the operative App Store guidelines. This preliminary injunction supersedes the prior temporary restraining order.
    • In its complaint, Epic Games is arguing that Apple’s practices violate federal and California antitrust and anti-competition laws. Epic Games argued:
      • This case concerns Apple’s use of a series of anti-competitive restraints and monopolistic practices in markets for (i) the distribution of software applications (“apps”) to users of mobile computing devices like smartphones and tablets, and (ii) the processing of consumers’ payments for digital content used within iOS mobile apps(“in-app content”). Apple imposes unreasonable and unlawful restraints to completely monopolize both markets and prevent software developers from reaching the over one billion users of its mobile devices (e.g., iPhone and iPad) unless they go through a single store controlled by Apple, the App Store, where Apple exacts an oppressive 30% tax on the sale of every app. Apple also requires software developers who wish to sell digital in-app content to those consumers to use a single payment processing option offered by Apple, In-App Purchase, which likewise carries a 30% tax.
      • In contrast, software developers can make their products available to users of an Apple personal computer (e.g., Mac or MacBook) in an open market, through a variety of stores or even through direct downloads from a developer’s website, with a variety of payment options and competitive processing fees that average 3%, a full ten times lower than the exorbitant 30% fees Apple applies to its mobile device in-app purchases.
    • In its late August denial of Epic Games’ request for a temporary restraining order, the court decided the plaintiff does not necessarily have an antitrust case strong enough to succeed on the merits, has not demonstrated irreparable harm because the “current predicament appears to be of its own making,” would unjustifiably be enriched if Fortnite is reinstated to the App Store without having to pay 30% of in app purchases to Apple, and is not operating in a public interest strong enough to overcome the expectation private parties will honor their contracts or resolve disputes through normal means.
  • As part of its Digital Modernization initiative, the Department of Defense (DOD) released its Data Strategy which is supposed to change how the DOD and its components collect, process, and use data, which is now being framed as an essential element of 21st Century conflicts. The DOD stated:
    • DOD must accelerate its progress towards becoming a data-centric organization. DOD has lacked the enterprise data management to ensure that trusted, critical data is widely available to or accessible by mission commanders, warfighters, decision-makers, and mission partners in a real- time, useable, secure, and linked manner. This limits data-driven decisions and insights, which hinders the execution of swift and appropriate action.
    • Additionally, DOD software and hardware systems must be designed, procured, tested, upgraded, operated, and sustained with data interoperability as a key requirement. All too often these gaps are bridged with unnecessary human-machine interfaces that introduce complexity, delay, and increased risk of error. This constrains the Department’s ability to operate against threats at machine speed across all domains.
    • DOD also must improve skills in data fields necessary for effective data management. The Department must broaden efforts to assess our current talent, recruit new data experts, and retain our developing force while establishing policies to ensure that data talent is cultivated. We must also spend the time to increase the data acumen resident across the workforce and find optimal ways to promote a culture of data awareness.
    • The DOD explained how it will implement the new strategy:
      • Strengthened data governance will include increased oversight at multiple levels. The Office of the DOD Chief Data Officer (CDO) will govern the Department’s data management efforts and ensure sustained focus by DOD leaders. The DOD Chief Information Officer (DOD CIO) will ensure that data priorities are fully integrated into the DOD Digital Modernization program, ensuring synchronization with DOD’s cloud; AI; Command, Control, and Communications (C3); and cybersecurity efforts. The DOD CIO will also promote compliance with CDO guidance via CIO authorities for managing IT investments, issuing DOD policy, and certifying Service/component budgets.
      • The CDO Council, chaired by the DOD CDO, will serve as the primary venue for collaboration among data officers from across the Department. This body will identify and prioritize data challenges, develop solutions, and oversee policy and data standards of the Department. While working closely with the appropriate governance bodies, members of the CDO Council must also advocate that data considerations be made an integral part of all the Department’s requirements, research, procurement, budgeting, and manpower decisions.
    • The DOD concluded:
      • Data underpins digital modernization and is increasingly the fuel of every DOD process, algorithm, and weapon system. The DOD Data Strategy describes an ambitious approach for transforming the Department into a data-driven organization. This requires strong and effective data management coupled with close partnerships with users, particularly warfighters. Every leader must treat data as a weapon system, stewarding data throughout its lifecycle and ensuring it is made available to others. The Department must provide its personnel with the modern data skills and tools to preserve U.S. military advantage in day-to-day competition and ensure that they can prevail in conflict.
    • In its draft Digital Modernization Strategy, the DOD stated:
      • The DOD Digital Modernization Strategy, which also serves as the Department’s Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan, presents Information Technology (IT)-related modernization goals and objectives that provide essential support for the three lines of effort in the National Defense Strategy (NDS), and the supporting National Defense Business Operations Plan (NDBOP). It presents the DOD CIO’s vision for achieving the Department’s goals and creating “a more secure, coordinated, seamless, transparent, and cost-effective IT architecture that transforms data into actionable information and ensures dependable mission execution in the face of a persistent cyber threat.”

Coming Events

  • The European Union Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA), Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) and the Computer Emergency Response Team for the EU Institutions, Bodies and Agencies (CERT-EU) will hold the 4th annual IoT Security Conference series “to raise awareness on the security challenges facing the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem across the European Union:”
    • Supply Chain for IoT – 21 October at 15:00 to 16:30 CET
  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold an open commission meeting on 27 October, and the agency has released a tentative agenda:
    • Restoring Internet Freedom Order Remand – The Commission will consider an Order on Remand that would respond to the remand from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and conclude that the Restoring Internet Freedom Order promotes public safety, facilitates broadband infrastructure deployment, and allows the Commission to continue to provide Lifeline support for broadband Internet access service. (WC Docket Nos. 17-108, 17-287, 11- 42)
    • Establishing a 5G Fund for Rural America – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would establish the 5G Fund for Rural America to ensure that all Americans have access to the next generation of wireless connectivity. (GN Docket No. 20-32)
    • Increasing Unlicensed Wireless Opportunities in TV White Spaces – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would increase opportunities for unlicensed white space devices to operate on broadcast television channels 2-35 and expand wireless broadband connectivity in rural and underserved areas. (ET Docket No. 20-36)
    • Streamlining State and Local Approval of Certain Wireless Structure Modifications – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would further accelerate the deployment of 5G by providing that modifications to existing towers involving limited ground excavation or deployment would be subject to streamlined state and local review pursuant to section 6409(a) of the Spectrum Act of 2012. (WT Docket No. 19-250; RM-11849)
    • Revitalizing AM Radio Service with All-Digital Broadcast Option – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would authorize AM stations to transition to an all-digital signal on a voluntary basis and would also adopt technical specifications for such stations. (MB Docket Nos. 13-249, 19-311)
    • Expanding Audio Description of Video Content to More TV Markets – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would expand audio description requirements to 40 additional television markets over the next four years in order to increase the amount of video programming that is accessible to blind and visually impaired Americans. (MB Docket No. 11-43)
    • Modernizing Unbundling and Resale Requirements – The Commission will consider a Report and Order to modernize the Commission’s unbundling and resale regulations, eliminating requirements where they stifle broadband deployment and the transition to next- generation networks, but preserving them where they are still necessary to promote robust intermodal competition. (WC Docket No. 19-308)
    • Enforcement Bureau Action – The Commission will consider an enforcement action.
  • On October 29, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold a seminar titled “Green Lights & Red Flags: FTC Rules of the Road for Business workshop” that “will bring together Ohio business owners and marketing executives with national and state legal experts to provide practical insights to business and legal professionals about how established consumer protection principles apply in today’s fast-paced marketplace.”
  • The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee will reportedly hold a hearing on 29 October regarding 47 U.S.C. 230 with testimony from:
    • Jack Dorsey, Chief Executive Officer of Twitter;
    • Sundar Pichai, Chief Executive Officer of Alphabet Inc. and its subsidiary, Google; and 
    • Mark Zuckerberg, Chief Executive Officer of Facebook.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by amrothman from Pixabay

Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events (13 October)

Further Reading

  •  “False Rumors Often Start at the Top” By Shira Ovide — The New York Times. This piece traces how misinformation can arise from poorly phrased or ambiguous statements and utterances from authorities or famous people. Throw in a very liberal dose of people misinterpreting, and it’s a miracle there’s any clear communication online.
  • With election day looming, Twitter imposes new limits on U.S. politicians — and ordinary users, too” By Elizabeth Dwoskin and Craig Timberg — The Washington Post. The social media platform will police misinformation and lies spread by American politicians with more than 100,000 followers, especially with respect to the outcome of elections that have not yet been decided. This change is part of a suite of measures to blunt the viral nature of incorrect or maliciously intended Tweets. An interesting change is one designed to add friction to retweeting by asking the user if they want to add their thoughts to a Tweet they are trying to retweet. Perhaps, such modifications point the way to blunting how quickly bad or wrong information goes viral.
  • Why Facebook Can’t Fix Itself” By Andrew Marantz — New Yorker. This article lays bare the central tension in the social media platform: its income is driven by content that outrages or hooks people and any serious effort to remove lies, misinformation, hate speech, and extremist material would remove the content it needs to outrage and hook people.
  • Feds may target Google’s Chrome browser for breakup” By Leah Nylen — Politico. It appears there may be two antitrust suits against Google targeting three of the company’s businesses: online advertising, the online search market, and its Google Chrome browser. The United States Department of Justice and state attorneys general may ask courts to break up the company. Of course, the resolution of such a massive undertaking could take years to play out.
  • Cyber Command has sought to disrupt the world’s largest botnet, hoping to reduce its potential impact on the election” By Ellen Nakashima — The Washington Post and “Microsoft seeks to disrupt Russian criminal botnet it fears could seek to sow confusion in the presidential election” By Jay Greene and Ellen Nakashima — The Washington Post. United States (U.S.) Cyber Command and Microsoft went at the same botnet from different directions ahead of the U.S. election in an attempt to batter and disorganize the Russian organization enough to foil any possible ransomware attacks on election systems.

Other Developments

  • The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) sent its “its 2020 Interim Report and Third Quarter Recommendations” to Congress and the Trump Administration ahead of the March 2021 due date for its final report. Notably, the NSCAI is calling for Congress and the White House to figure out which entity in the Executive Office of the President (EOP) should lead and coordinate the United States’ (U.S.) artificial intelligence (AI) efforts. Again, the NSCAI framed AI as being a key part of the “great power” struggle between the U.S. and rivals like the People’s Republic of China; although it is often unsaid that the U.S. is also theoretically competing with ostensible allies like the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) in leading AI development and reaping the national security and economic gains projected to accompany being the preeminent nation on this field. However, as with many of these commissions, Congress and the Administration must navigate the jurisdictions of current government stakeholders who are almost always reluctant to relinquish their claims to a policy field and will often work to preserve their role even at the cost of frustrating larger efforts. It is very likely Congress folds recommendations into a future National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), quite possibly the bill for FY 2022 since the final report will be delivered in the midst of the drafting and consideration of the annual bill to set national security policy.
    • Nonetheless, the NSCAI stated “[t]his report represents our third quarterly memo as well as our second interim report mandated by Congress….[and] we present 66 recommendations flowing from several key ideas:
      • First, we must defend democracies from AI-enabled disinformation and other malign uses of AI by our adversaries.
      • Second, the government should expand and democratize basic AI research—the wellspring of our technological advantages.
      • Third, the government must build a digital ecosystem within national security departments and agencies for AI R&D.
      • Fourth, connecting technologists and operators will be the key to leveraging AI in all national security missions.
      • Fifth, we must close the tech talent deficit by strengthening STEM education, recruiting the best minds from around the world, and training the national security workforce.
      • Sixth, we must build a resilient domestic microelectronics industrial base.
      • Seventh, we will need interconnected strategies for technologies associated with AI including biotechnology and quantum computing.
      • Eighth, we cannot only focus on domestic initiatives in a global competition.
    • The NSCAI declared “[w]e must lead the development of AI technical standards and norms in international forums, and strengthen AI partnerships with allies and partners to build a digital future reflecting our values and protecting our interests.”
    • The NSCAI asserted:
      • The totality of the recommendations illustrates a key point: Laying out a vision is not enough. A winning strategy demands major muscle movements in and across departments and agencies, and significant executive and legislative action. It requires overcoming the technical, bureaucratic, and human obstacles to change, and driving very specific policies.
      • We believe the United States needs a new White House-led technology council to elevate AI- driven technology developments to the center of national decision-making, and a technology advisor to lead a new technology competitiveness strategy that integrates the complex interplay between technology, national security, and economic policies.
  • Key Republican stakeholders introduced the “Beat CHINA for 5G Act of 2020” that would require the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to auction off a prized piece of mid-band spectrum to speed the roll out of 5G in the United States (U.S.) The bill was introduced by Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chair Roger Wicker (R-MS), Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet Subcommittee Chair John Thune (R-SD), House Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Greg Walden (R-OR), and Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and Representative Bob Latta (R-OH).
    • In their press release, they claimed:
      • The Beat CHINA for 5G Act of 2020 would empower the FCC to open more critical mid-band spectrum for non-federal, commercial wireless use by requiring the FCC to begin an auction of the 3.45-3.55 GHz band by December 2021.
      • In February 2018, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) identified the 3.45-3.55 GHz band as a candidate for potential repurposing. Earlier this year, NTIA released a technical report indicating that spectrum sharing opportunities were possible in this band.
      • In August 2020, the White House announced that it would make 100 MHz of mid-band spectrum in the 3.45-3.55 GHz band available for non-federal, commercial wireless use. In September 2020, the FCC took a first step to start transitioning existing services to make this band available for 5G use.
      • These actions by the Trump Administration are crucial to growing our economy and enhancing our national security. This legislation is the final step to making sure there are no delays and this auction stays on track.
    • In early August, the White House and the Department of Defense (DOD) announced it would make available 100 MHz of mid-band spectrum in the 3450-3550 MHz band. (See here for more detail.)
  • In a press release, the Department of Defense (DOD) detailed its “$600 million in awards for 5G experimentation and testing at five U.S. military test sites, representing the largest full-scale 5G tests for dual-use applications in the world.” These awards were made largely to prominent private sector technology and telecommunications companies vying to play prominent roles in 5G. However, of course, no awards were made to companies from the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Nonetheless, this announcement may provoke further claims from Members of Congress and stakeholders that the DOD’s effort is the camel’s nose under the tent of a nationalized 5G system.
    • This announcement is part of the DOD’s 5G Strategy that “provides the DOD approach to implementing the National Strategy to Secure 5G and aligns with the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (FY2020), Section 254…[that] is also consistent with National Defense Strategy guidance to lead in key areas of great power competition and lethality to ensure 5G’s ‘impact on the battle network of the future.’”
    • In a related DOD release, it was explained:
      • The effort — Tranche 1 of the department’s larger 5G initiative — will accelerate adoption of 5G technology, enhance the effectiveness and lethality of U.S. combat forces, and further the development and use of common 5G standards to ensure interoperability with military partners and allies.
    • The DOD added:
      • Each installation will partner military Services, industry leaders, and academic experts to advance the Department’s 5G capabilities. Projects will include piloting 5G-enabled augmented/virtual reality for mission planning and training, testing 5G-enabled Smart Warehouses, and evaluating 5G technologies to enhance distributed command and control.
    • The DOD provided details on the 5G experimentation for these Tranche 1 sites:
      • Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM), Washington – Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality Training 
        • The objective of this project is to rapidly field a scalable, resilient, and secure 5G network to provide a test bed for experimentation with a 5G-enabled Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality (AR/VR) capability for mission planning, distributed training, and operational use.  Industry partners at this site include:
        • GBL System Corp. (GBL): GBL’s Samsung-based 5G testbed will utilize mid-band spectrum to provide high capacity, low latency coverage at JBLM (Approximately 3 sq. mi.) and Yakima Training Center (Approximately 15 sq. mi.).
        • AT&T: AT&T will develop a system to allow use of 5G connectivity with present training devices.
        • Oceus Networks: Oceus will develop and field a Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) based 5G handheld called Tough Mobile Device-5G (TMD-5G) for the field training environment.
        • Booz-Allen Hamilton (BAH): BAH will deliver an Army-owned, multivendor prototype for combat-like training using AR/VR technology in 5G-enhanced training locations based on an Open Systems Architecture (OSA).
      • Naval Base San Diego (NBSD), California – 5G Smart Warehousing (Transshipment)
        • The objective of this project is to develop a 5G-enabled Smart Warehouse focused on transshipment between shore facilities and naval units, to increase the efficiency and fidelity of naval logistic operations, including identification, recording, organization, storage, retrieval, and transportation of materiel and supplies.  Additionally, the project will create a proving ground for testing, refining, and validating emerging 5G-enabled technologies.  Industry partners at this site include:
        • AT&T: AT&T will quickly deploy (within 9 months) a network based on commercially available equipment to support 4G and 5G utilizing cellular spectrum in both the sub-6 GHz and millimeter wave bands.
        • GE Research: GE Research 5G-enabled applications will support real-time asset tracking, warehouse modeling and predictive analytics.
        • Vectrus Mission Solutions Corporation (Vectrus): Vectrus applications will provide industry-leading capabilities for inventory management, network security, robotic material moving, & environmental sensing.
        • Deloitte Consulting LLP (Deloitte): Deloitte will support a wide array of applications including Autonomous Mobile Robots, Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) with autonomous drones, biometrics, cameras, AR/VR, and digitally tracked inventory.
      • Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB) Albany, Georgia – 5G Smart Warehousing (Vehicular)
        • This project will develop a 5G-enabled Smart Warehouse focused on vehicular storage and maintenance, to increase the efficiency and fidelity of MCLB Albany logistic operations, including identification, recording, organization, storage, retrieval, and inventory control of materiel and supplies.  Additionally, the project will create a proving ground for testing, refining, and validating emerging 5G-enabled technologies.  Industry partners at this site include:
        • Federated Wireless: Federated Wireless leverages open standards and an open solution to provide a testbed with both indoor and outdoor coverage, supporting a growing segment of the US 5G equipment market. 
        • GE Research: The GE approach will support real-time asset tracking, facility modeling and predictive analytics.
        • KPMG LLP: KPMG applications will create an integrated, automated, and digitized process for equipment and product movement throughout the warehouse.
        • Scientific Research Corporation (SRC): SRC’s 5G-enabled offering will demonstrate automated management and control of warehouse logistics, asset and inventory tracking, environmental management, and facility access control.
      • Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada – Distributed Command and Control
        • The objective of this effort is to develop a testbed for use of 5G technologies to aid in Air, Space, and Cyberspace lethality while enhancing command and control (C2) survivability.  Specifically, a 5G network will be employed to disaggregate and mobilize the existing C2 architectures in an agile combat employment scenario.
        • Industry partners at this site include:
        • AT&T: AT&T will provide an initially fixed then mobile 5G environment with high capacity and low latency to support the connectivity requirements associated with the mobile combined air operations centers.
      • Hill Air Force Base, Utah – Dynamic Spectrum Utilization
        • This project addresses the challenge of enabling Air Force radars to dynamically share spectrum with 5G cellular services.  The project will develop sharing/coexistence system prototypes and evaluate their effectiveness with real-world, at-scale networks in controlled environments.  The objective of this effort is to develop effective methodologies to allow the sharing or coexistence between airborne radar systems and 5G cellular telephony systems in the 3.1 – 3.45 GHz band.  Industry partners at this site include:
        • Nokia: The Nokia testbed includes traditional as well as open standards architectures including high-power massive multi-antenna systems.
        • General Dynamics Mission Systems, Inc. (GDMS): GDMS will develop and field a novel coexistence application that includes independent tracking of radar signals to support the radio access network in mitigation actions.
        • Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH): BAH’s approach utilizes Artificial Intelligence to provide a complete coexistence system with rapid response to interference. 
        • Key Bridge Wireless LLC: Key Bridge will demonstrate an adaptation of an existing commercial spectrum sharing approach for the 3.1-3.45 GHz band as a low risk solution to the coexistence issues.
        • Shared Spectrum Company (SSC): SSC’s approach aims to maintain continuous 5G communications via early radar detections and 5G-enabled Dynamic Spectrum Access.
        • Ericsson: Ericsson’s novel approach employs the 5G infrastructure to provide the required sensing coupled with Machine Learning and 5G-enabled spectrum aggregation.
  • Facebook announced it is suing two companies for data scraping in a suit filed in California state court. In its complaint, Facebook asserted:
    • Beginning no later than September 2019 and continuing until at least September 2020, Defendants BrandTotal Ltd. (BrandTotal ́) and Unimania, Inc. (Unimania) developed and distributed internet browser extensions (malicious extensions) designed to improperly collect data from Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, Amazon, Facebook, and Instagram. Defendants distributed the malicious extensions on the Google Chrome Store. Anyone who installed one of Defendants malicious extensions essentially self-compromised their browsers to run automated programs designed to collect data about its user from specific websites. As to Facebook and Instagram, when a user visited those sites with a self-compromised browser, Defendants used the malicious extensions to connect to Facebook computers and collect or scrape ́ user profile information (including name, user ID, gender, date of birth, relationship status, and location information), advertisements and advertising metrics (including name of the advertiser, image and text of the advertisement, and user interaction and reaction metrics), and user Ad Preferences (user advertisement interest information). Defendants used the data collected by the malicious extensions to sell marketing intelligence, and other services through the website brandtotal.com. Defendants’ conduct was not authorized by Facebook.
    • Facebook brings this action to stop Defendants’ violations of Facebook’s and Instagram’s Terms and Policies. Facebook also brings this action to obtain damages and disgorgement for breach of contract and unjust enrichment.
    • Of course, it is a bit entertaining to see Facebook take issue with the data collection techniques of others given the myriad ways it tracks so many people across the internet especially when they are not even interacting with Facebook or logged into the social media platform. See here, here, and here for more on Facebook’s practices, some of which may even be illegal in a number of countries, and, of course, some of the most egregious practices led to the record $5 billion fine levied by the Federal Trade Commission.

Coming Events

  • The European Union Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA), Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) and the Computer Emergency Response Team for the EU Institutions, Bodies and Agencies (CERT-EU) will hold the 4th annual IoT Security Conference series “to raise awareness on the security challenges facing the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem across the European Union:”
    • Artificial Intelligence – 14 October at 15:00 to 16:30 CET
    • Supply Chain for IoT – 21 October at 15:00 to 16:30 CET
  • The House Intelligence Committee will conduct a virtual hearing titled “Misinformation, Conspiracy Theories, and ‘Infodemics’: Stopping the Spread Online.”
  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold an open commission meeting on 27 October, and the agency has released a tentative agenda:
    • Restoring Internet Freedom Order Remand – The Commission will consider an Order on Remand that would respond to the remand from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and conclude that the Restoring Internet Freedom Order promotes public safety, facilitates broadband infrastructure deployment, and allows the Commission to continue to provide Lifeline support for broadband Internet access service. (WC Docket Nos. 17-108, 17-287, 11- 42)
    • Establishing a 5G Fund for Rural America – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would establish the 5G Fund for Rural America to ensure that all Americans have access to the next generation of wireless connectivity. (GN Docket No. 20-32)
    • Increasing Unlicensed Wireless Opportunities in TV White Spaces – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would increase opportunities for unlicensed white space devices to operate on broadcast television channels 2-35 and expand wireless broadband connectivity in rural and underserved areas. (ET Docket No. 20-36)
    • Streamlining State and Local Approval of Certain Wireless Structure Modifications – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would further accelerate the deployment of 5G by providing that modifications to existing towers involving limited ground excavation or deployment would be subject to streamlined state and local review pursuant to section 6409(a) of the Spectrum Act of 2012. (WT Docket No. 19-250; RM-11849)
    • Revitalizing AM Radio Service with All-Digital Broadcast Option – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would authorize AM stations to transition to an all-digital signal on a voluntary basis and would also adopt technical specifications for such stations. (MB Docket Nos. 13-249, 19-311)
    • Expanding Audio Description of Video Content to More TV Markets – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would expand audio description requirements to 40 additional television markets over the next four years in order to increase the amount of video programming that is accessible to blind and visually impaired Americans. (MB Docket No. 11-43)
    • Modernizing Unbundling and Resale Requirements – The Commission will consider a Report and Order to modernize the Commission’s unbundling and resale regulations, eliminating requirements where they stifle broadband deployment and the transition to next- generation networks, but preserving them where they are still necessary to promote robust intermodal competition. (WC Docket No. 19-308)
    • Enforcement Bureau Action – The Commission will consider an enforcement action.
  • On October 29, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold a seminar titled “Green Lights & Red Flags: FTC Rules of the Road for Business workshop” that “will bring together Ohio business owners and marketing executives with national and state legal experts to provide practical insights to business and legal professionals about how established consumer protection principles apply in today’s fast-paced marketplace.”
  • The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee will reportedly hold a hearing on 29 October regarding 47 U.S.C. 230 with testimony from:
    • Jack Dorsey, Chief Executive Officer of Twitter;
    • Sundar Pichai, Chief Executive Officer of Alphabet Inc. and its subsidiary, Google; and 
    • Mark Zuckerberg, Chief Executive Officer of Facebook.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events (31 July)

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

Here are Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events.

Coming Events

  • On 31 July, the House Intelligence Committee will mark up its Intelligence Authorization Act.
  • On 31 July the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress will hold a business meeting “to consider proposed recommendations.”
  • On 3 August the House Oversight and Reform Committee will hold a hearing on the tenth “Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act” (FITARA) scorecard on federal information technology.
  • On 4 August, the Senate Armed Services Committee will hold a hearing titled “Findings and Recommendations of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission” with these witnesses:
    • Senator Angus S. King, Jr. (I-ME), Co-Chair, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
    • Representative Michael J. Gallagher (R-WI), Co-Chair, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
    • Brigadier General John C. Inglis, ANG (Ret.), Commissioner, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
  • On 6 August, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold an open meeting to likely consider the following items:
    • C-band Auction Procedures. The Commission will consider a Public Notice that would adopt procedures for the auction of new flexible-use overlay licenses in the 3.7–3.98 GHz band (Auction 107) for 5G, the Internet of Things, and other advanced wireless services. (AU Docket No. 20-25)
    • Radio Duplication Rules. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would eliminate the radio duplication rule with regard to AM stations and retain the rule for FM stations. (MB Docket Nos. 19-310. 17-105)
    • Common Antenna Siting Rules. The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would eliminate the common antenna siting rules for FM and TV broadcaster applicants and licensees. (MB Docket Nos. 19-282, 17-105)
    • Telecommunications Relay Service. The Commission will consider a Report and Order to repeal certain TRS rules that are no longer needed in light of changes in technology and voice communications services. (CG Docket No. 03-123)
  • The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will hold the “Exploring Artificial Intelligence (AI) Trustworthiness: Workshop Series Kickoff Webinar,” “a NIST initiative involving private and public sector organizations and individuals in discussions about building blocks for trustworthy AI systems and the associated measurements, methods, standards, and tools to implement those building blocks when developing, using, and testing AI systems” on 6 August.
  • On 18 August, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will host the “Bias in AI Workshop, a virtual event to develop a shared understanding of bias in AI, what it is, and how to measure it.”

Other Developments

  • The European Commission (EC) released a report on the status of efforts across the European Union (EU) to implement the EU Toolbox on 5G Cybersecurity, the bloc’s approach to navigating security issues presented by equipment and services offered by companies from the People’s Republic of China such as Huawei. The EC concluded
    • All  Member  States  reported  that  concrete  steps  have  been  taken  to  implement  the  Toolbox.  Most  Member  States  carried  out  a  gap  analysis  and  launched  a  process  to  review  and  upgrade  existing security measures and enforcement mechanisms. Many Member States have already adopted or are well advanced in the preparation of more advanced security measures on 5G cybersecurity.
    • However,  work  is  still  ongoing  in  many  Member  States  on  defining  the  content  and  scope  of  the  measures and in some cases, political decisions still need to be made in this regard. In addition, even where  measures  are  in  progress  or  being  planned,  not  all  Member  States  have  shared  detailed information about every measure, due to diverse stages in the national implementation processor for national security reasons. Nevertheless, a number of findings can be formulated based on the analysis presented  in  this  report as  regards  the  implementation  of  the  Toolbox  and  areas  where  specific  attention  is  needed  in  the  next  phases  of  the  implementation  of  the  Toolbox  at  national  and/or  EU  level.
  • The United States (US) and Australia released this joint statement after this week’s Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations (AUSMIN) after the heads of their defense and foreign ministries met in Washington DC. The two countries listed a number of steps and initiatives designed to counter the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Among other developments:
    • The US and Australia signed a classified Statement of Principles on Alliance Defense Cooperation and Force Posture Priorities in the Indo-Pacific.
    • The two nations “plan to continue to counter these threats vigorously, including through collaboration with international partners, and through a new working group between the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Department of State, which will monitor and respond to disinformation efforts.”
    • The US and Australia “expressed deep concern that the targeting of intellectual property and sensitive business information, including information relating to the development of vaccines and treatments for pandemic response, presents an increasing threat to the global economy, and they committed to holding malicious actors accountable.”
    • The countries “noted the role of 5G network security best practices, such as the Prague Proposals, and expressed their intent to work with like-minded partners to develop end-to-end technical solutions for 5G that use trusted vendors….[and] [a]cknowledging that 5G is only the starting point, the two nations also reaffirm their commitment to lifting the security of critical and emerging technologies that will be vital to our nations’ prosperity.”
    • The US and Australia “welcomed the announcement that Lynas has signed a Phase 1 contract with the U.S. Department of Defense for an engineering and market feasibility study for the design of a heavy rare earth separation facility in the United States” and “the continued development of a U.S.-Australia Critical Minerals Plan of Action to improve the security of critical minerals in the United States and Australia.” 
  • The United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has issued a report titled “The Cyber Threat to Sports Organisations” “to demystify the cyber threat to sports organisations by highlighting the cyber security issues that affect the sector on a daily basis: business email compromise, digital fraud, and venue security.” The NCSC asserted
    • cyber attacks against sports organisations are very common, with 70% of those surveyed experiencing at least one attack per annum. This is significantly higher than the average across UK business.
    • The primary cyber threat comes from cyber criminals with a financial motive. Criminal attacks typically take advantage of poor implementation of technical controls and normal human traits such as trust and ineffective password policies.
    • There have been a small number of Hostile Nation-state attacks against sports organisations; typically, these attacks have exploited the same vulnerabilities used by criminals.
    • The most common outcome of cyber attacks is unauthorised access to email accounts (Business Email Compromise) leading to fraud. Ransomware is also a significant issue in the sector.
  • Top Republicans on one of the committees with jurisdiction over technology have written Google and Apple regarding their “app store and the policies you have in place to ensure apps are appropriately vetted, particularly those with close ties to China and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).” House Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Greg Walden (R-OR) and Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee Ranking Member Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) are asking the companies to respond by 12 August to a series of questions. They asserted
    • As with any crisis, there are those that seek to exploit opportunities for their own malicious intent. We believe that bad actors may be taking advantage of the American people’s trust in your brand, which likely extends to apps available through your store. While we want an open and transparent marketplace that does not limit innovators outside your company, we know there are those that seek to use apps as a means to push through pop-up ads or hijack devices to make it a tool for eavesdropping.
    • The level of permissions that these apps require may include access to camera, microphone, and contacts, as well as functionality to load other malware for bad actors to control a device even after the original app has been removed. This is especially alarming when it comes from companies with direct or indirect links to the CCP.
  • A Washington DC think tank published a report written in part with Representatives Robin Kelly (D-IL) and Will Hurd (R-TX) titled “AI and the Workforce.” The Bipartisan Policy Center explained that “[b]ased on our discussions with stakeholders, we have identified the following key principles:
    • 1. The United States should embrace and take a leadership role in the AI-driven economy by filling the AI talent gap and preparing the rest of the workforce for the jobs of the future. However, in doing so, policymakers should make inclusivity and equal opportunity a priority.
    • 2. Closing the AI talent gap requires a targeted approach to training, recruiting, and retaining skilled workers. This AI talent should ideally have a multi-disciplinary skill set that includes ethics.
    • 3. The AI talent gap is not the only challenge of the AI-driven economy, so the federal government should focus more broadly on the jobs of the future and skills that are complemented by AI technology. Additionally, encouraging workers to develop basic AI and technological literacy can help them better determine how to complement AI systems.
    • 4. The educational system from kindergarten through post-college is not yet designed for the AI-driven economy and should be modernized.
    • 5. The skills that will be in demand in the future will continuously change, so lifelong learning and ways to help displaced and mid-career workers transition into new jobs is critical for the workforce of the future.
    • In September 2018, Kelly and Hurd released a white paper detailing the “lessons learned from the Subcommittee’s oversight and hearings on AI and sets forth recommendations for moving forward.” 
  • The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) updated its “Mobile Device Guidance” regarding “Windows 10, Android and VPNs. The NCSC stated “[o]ver the next few months, we’ll be bringing our Chrome OS and Ubuntu Linux guidance up to date and into the new format.”
  • Cybersecurity company FireEye released a report on a new type of Russian disinformation campaign where hackers are gaining access to legitimate news sources and planting fake stories that are subsequently amplified on social media.
    • FireEye explained it
      • has tied together several information operations that we assess with moderate confidence comprise part of a broader influence campaign, ongoing since at least March 2017, aligned with Russian security interests. The operations have primarily targeted audiences in Lithuania, Latvia, and Poland with narratives critical of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) presence in Eastern Europe, occasionally leveraging other themes such as anti-U.S. and COVID-19-related narratives as part of this broader anti-NATO agenda. We have dubbed this campaign “Ghostwriter.”
    • FireEye added
      • Many, though not all, of the incidents we suspect to be part of the Ghostwriter campaign appear to have leveraged website compromises or spoofed email accounts to disseminate fabricated content, including falsified news articles, quotes, correspondence and other documents designed to appear as coming from military officials and political figures in the target countries. This falsified content has been referenced as source material in articles and op-eds authored by at least 14 inauthentic personas posing as locals, journalists, and analysts within those countries.

Further Reading

  • Rite Aid deployed facial recognition systems in hundreds of U.S. stores” by Jeffrey Dastin– Reuters. A major United States retailer was using facial recognition technology mostly at stores in poorer, more ethnically diverse areas that seems connected to a company in the People’s Republic of China. Rite Aid has ceased use of this system that was implemented to address shoplifting and other crime and guards and other personnel were supposed to act when the system turned up a hit on a person in the store who had committed a crime or made trouble in another location. Given the accuracy of this sort of technology, there were a range of false positives. Additionally, locations in New York City that had similar crime profiles in majority white, affluent areas were much less likely to have this system. The company, DeepCamLLC, providing the technology appears intimately connected to a Chinese firm, Shenzhen Shenmu, that appears funded by a Beijing run venture capital/investment fund.
  • Facebook Wins Temporary Halt to EU Antitrust Data Demands” by Stephanie Bodoni – Bloomberg. In a setback for the European Commission’s (EC) investigation, the European Union General Court has temporarily blocked data and document requests in a pair of rulings. The court ruled for Facebook in finding the EC’s request “may unavoidably include personal information” and so “it is important to ensure that confidential treatment of such information is safeguarded, especially when the information does, at first sight, not appear to have any link with the subject matter of the commission’s investigation.” A Facebook attorney claimed the requests were going to net “highly sensitive personal information such as employees’ medical information, personal financial documents, and private information about family members of employees.” The court is expected to issue a final decision on the data requests, which has obvious implications for the EC’s investigation of Facebook.
  • Google’s Top Search Result? Surprise! It’s Google” By Adrianne Jeffries and Leon Yin – The Markup. Google’s search results have changed tremendously over the last 15 years from showing the top organic results to now reserving the 50% of the page for Google results and products. As a result a number of online businesses that compete with Google products have withered and some have died. Google denies abusing its market power, but competitors and possibly some regulators think otherwise, possibly foreshadowing future anti-competitive enforcement actions.
  • Five Eyes alliance could expand in scope to counteract China” by Patrick Wintour – The Guardian. The United States, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia may expand both the scope of heir Five Eyes arrangement and the membership as a means of pushing back on Chinese policies and actions. Japan could possibly join the alliance and perhaps it serves as the basis for a trade agreement to address Beijing.
  • Huawei to double down on HSBC as legal battle over extradition of Meng Wanzhou intensifies” by Zhou Xin – South China Morning Post. As the daughter of Huawei’s founder continues to be held in Canada facing possible extradition to the United States (US) to be tried on charges of violating US sanctions on Iran. Meng Wanzhou’s lawyers are focusing on the evidence provided by Hong Kong based bank HSBC to the US Department of Justice as being deficient in a number of ways. The People’s Republic of China is still holding two Canadians incommunicado who were arrested and charged with espionage after Meng was detained in British Columbia.

© Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog and michaelkans.blog, 2019-2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Michael Kans, Michael Kans Blog, and michaelkans.blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events (21 July)

First things first, if you would like to receive my Technology Policy Update, email me. You can find some of these Updates from 2019 and 2020 here.

Here are Further Reading, Other Developments, and Coming Events.

Coming Events

  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will hold its fifth annual PrivacyCon on 21 July and has released its agenda.
  • On 22 July, the Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee will markup a number of bills and nominations, including:
    • The nomination of Derek Kan to the Office of Management and Budget’s Deputy Director
    • The “Federal Emergency Pandemic Response Act” (S.4204)
    • The “Securing Healthcare and Response Equipment Act of 2020” (S.4210)
    • The “National Response Framework Improvement Act of 2020” (S.4153)
    • The “National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Pandemic Modeling Act of 2020” (S.4157)
    • The “PPE Supply Chain Transparency Act of 2020” (S.4158)
    • The “REAL ID Act Modernization Act” (S.4133)
    • The “Safeguarding American Innovation Act” (S.3997)
    • The “Information Technology Modernization Centers of Excellence Program Act” (S.4200)
    • The “Telework for U.S. Innovation Act” (S.4318)
    • The “GAO Database Modernization Act” (S.____)
    • The “CFO Vision Act of 2020” (S.3287)
    • The “No Tik Tok on Government Devices Act” (S. 3455)
    • The “Cybersecurity Advisory Committee Authorization Act of 2020” (S. 4024)
  • On 23 July, the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee’s Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet Subcommittee will hold a hearing on “The State of U.S. Spectrum Policy” with the following witnesses:
    • Mr. Tom Power, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, CTIA
    • Mr. Mark Gibson, Director of Business Development, CommScope
    • Dr. Roslyn Layton, Visiting Researcher, Aalborg University
    • Mr. Michael Calabrese, Director, Wireless Future Project, Open Technology Institute at New America
  • On  27 July, the House Judiciary Committee’s Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law Subcommittee will hold its sixth hearing on “Online Platforms and Market Power” titled “Examining the Dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google” that will reportedly have the heads of the four companies as witnesses.
  • On 6 August, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold an open meeting to likely consider the following items:
    • C-band Auction Procedures – The Commission will consider a Public Notice that would adopt procedures for the auction of new flexible-use overlay licenses in the 3.7–3.98 GHz band (Auction 107) for 5G, the Internet of Things, and other advanced wireless services. (AU Docket No. 20-25)
    • Radio Duplication Rules – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would eliminate the radio duplication rule with regard to AM stations and retain the rule for FM stations. (MB Docket Nos. 19-310. 17-105)
    • Common Antenna Siting Rules – The Commission will consider a Report and Order that would eliminate the common antenna siting rules for FM and TV broadcaster applicants and licensees. (MB Docket Nos. 19-282, 17-105)
    • Telecommunications Relay Service – The Commission will consider a Report and Order to repeal certain TRS rules that are no longer needed in light of changes in technology and voice communications services. (CG Docket No. 03-123)
    • Inmate Calling Services – The Commission will consider a Report and Order on Remand and a Fourth Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would respond to remands by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and propose to comprehensively reform rates and charges for the inmate calling services within the Commission’s jurisdiction.  (WC Docket No. 12-375)

Other Developments

  • A United States court has denied a motion by an Israeli technology company to dismiss an American tech giant’s suit that the former infected its messaging system with malware for purposes of espionage and harassment. In October 2019, WhatsApp and Facebook filed suit against the Israeli security firm, NSO Group, alleging that in April 2019, it sent “malware to approximately 1,400 mobile phones and devices…designed to infect the Target Devices for the purpose of conducting surveillance of specific WhatsApp users.” This step was taken, Facebook and WhatsApp claim, in order to circumvent WhatApp’s end-to-end encryption. The social media companies are suing “for injunctive relief and damages pursuant to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1030, and the California Comprehensive Computer Data Access and Fraud Act, California Penal Code § 502, and for breach of contract and trespass to chattels.” In the District Court’s ruling from last week, it rejected the NSO Group’s claims that it deserved sovereign immunity from the lawsuit because it was working for sovereign governments among others and will allow WhatsApp and Facebook to proceed with their suit.
  • The European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) published a report “on how EU institutions, bodies and agencies (EUIs) carry out Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs) when processing information that presents a high risk to the rights and freedom of natural persons” according to the EDPS’ press release. The EDPS detailed its lessons learned, suggestions on how EU institutions could execute better DPIAs, and additional guidance on how DPIAs should be performed in the future.
  • The Court of Justice of the European Union’s (CJEU) Advocate General Saugmandsgaard Øe rendered his opinion in case concerning the possible lability of YouTube and Uploaded for a user posting copyrighted materials without the consent of the owners. In a CJEU summary, Øe found “as EU law currently stands, online platform operators, such as YouTube and Uploaded, are not directly liable for the illegal uploading of protected works by the users of those platforms.” Øe noted that “Directive  2019/790 on  copyright  and  related rights  in  the  Digital  Single  Market introduces, for online platform operators such as YouTube, a new liability regime specific to works illegally uploaded by  the  users  of  such  platforms….which  must  be  transposed  by  each Member State into its national law by 7 June 2021at the latest, requires, inter alia, those operators to obtain an authorisation from the rightholders, for example by concluding a licensing agreement, for the works uploaded by users of their platforms.” The Advocate General’s decisions are not binding but work to inform the CJEU as it decides cases, but it is not uncommon for the CJEU to incorporate the Advocate General’s findings in their decisions.
  • The United Kingdom’s Parliament’s House of Lords’ Select Committee on Democracy and Digital Technologies released its report regarding “a pandemic of ‘misinformation’ and ‘disinformation’…[that] [i]f allowed to flourish these counterfeit truths will result in the collapse of public trust, and without trust democracy as we know it will simply decline into irrelevance.” The committee explained the report “addresses a number of concerns, including the urgent case for reform of electoral law and our overwhelming need to become a digitally literate society” including “forty-five  recommendations  which,  taken  together,  we  believe could serve as a useful response to a whole series of concerns.”
  • Belgium’s data protection authority, the Autorité de protection des données, has fined Google €600,000 for violations related to the company’s failure to heed the right to be forgotten as enforced under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  
  • The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released two crosswalks undertaken by outside entities comparing the NIST Privacy Framework: A Tool for Improving Privacy through Enterprise Risk Management to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and ISO/IEC 27701, private sector privacy guidance:
    • The Enterprivacy Consulting Group’s crosswalk for the GDPR-Regulation 2016/679.
  • Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) sent Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey a second letter regarding the Twitter hack and asserted:
    • [R]eports also indicate that screenshots of Twitter’s internal tools have been circulating within the hacking community. One such screenshot indicates that Twitter employs tools allowing it to append “Search Blacklist,” “Trends Blacklist,” “Bounced,” and “ReadOnly” flags to user accounts. Given your insistence in testimony to Congress that Twitter does not engage in politically biased “shadowbanning” and the public interest in Twitter’s moderation practices, it is notable that Twitter reportedly suspended user accounts sharing screenshots of this panel.
    • Hawley posed a series of questions seeking to root out a bias against conservative viewpoints on the platform, a frequently leveled charge.
  • The Ranking Members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, House Energy and Commerce Committee, and House Financial Services Committee wrote President Donald Trump to “encourage you to consider utilizing your ability under existing authorities to sanction PRC-linked hackers” for “targeting U.S. institutions and “attempting to identify and illicitly obtain valuable intellectual property (IP) and public health data related to vaccines, treatments, and testing from networks and personnel affiliated with COVID-19-related research.” In a May unclassified public service announcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and CISA named the People’s Republic of China as a nation waging a cyber campaign against U.S. COVID-19 researchers. The agencies stated they “are issuing this announcement to raise awareness of the threat to COVID-19-related research.” Last week, The United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), Canada’s Communications  Security Establishment (CSE), United States’ National Security Agency (NSA) and the United States’ Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security  Agency (CISA) issued a joint advisory on a Russian hacking organization’s efforts have “targeted various organisations involved in COVID-19 vaccine development in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, highly likely with the intention of stealing information and intellectual property relating to the development and testing of COVID-19 vaccines.”

Further Reading

  • Twitter’s security holes are now the nation’s problem“ – Politico; “Twitter hack triggers investigations and lawmaker concerns” – The Washington Post; “Hackers Convinced Twitter Employee to Help Them Hijack Accounts” – Vice’s Motherboard; “Twitter Struggles to Unpack a Hack Within Its Walls” and “Hackers Tell the Story of the Twitter Attack From the Inside” – The New York Times. After the hacking last week that took over a number of high profile people’s accounts (e.g. Barack Obama, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, etc.), policymakers in Washington are pressing Twitter for explanations and remediation to prevent any such future attacks, especially in the run up to the 2020 election. Reportedly, a group of hackers looking to push a Bitcoin scam took over accounts of famous people and then made it appear they were selling Bitcoin. Republicans and Democrats in the United States’ capital are alarmed that such a hack by another nation could throw the country and world into chaos. One media outlet is reporting the hackers provided proof they bribed a Twitter employee with access to administrative credentials to pull off the hack. Another is reporting that a hacker got into Twitter’s Slack channel where the credentials were posted. Nonetheless, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has opened an inquiry. It is unclear whether the hackers accessed people’s DM’s, and Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) noted he has secured a commitment from the company in 2018 to use encryption to secure DMs that has not yet been implemented. The company will have to answer more tough questions at a time when it is in the crosshairs of the rump Administration for alleged abuses of 47 U.S.C. 230 in stifling conservative viewpoints after the platform fact checked the President and has taken down a range of accounts. And, of course, working in the background is the company’s 2011 settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in which the agency claimed Twitter violated the FTC Act by “engag[ing] in a number of practices that, taken together, failed to provide reasonable and appropriate security to: prevent unauthorized access to nonpublic user information and honor the privacy choices exercised by its users in designating certain tweets as nonpublic…[and by] fail[ing] to prevent unauthorized administrative control of the Twitter system.” If the agency investigates and finds similar misconduct, they could seek sizeable monetary damages in federal court.
  • F.T.C.’s Facebook Investigation May Stretch Past Election” – The New York Times. Even though media accounts say the United States Department of Justice will bring an antitrust action against Google possibly as early as this month, it now appears the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will not be bringing a case against Facebook until next year. It appears the agency is weighing whether it should depose CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg and has made additional rounds of document requests, all of which has reportedly slowed down the investigation. Of course, should the investigation stretch into next year, a President Joe Biden could designate a new chair of the agency, which could change the scope and tenor of the investigation.
  • New Emails Reveal Warm Relationship Between Kamala Harris And Big Tech” – HuffPost. Obtained via an Freedom of Information request, new email from Senator Kamala Harris’ (D-CA) tenure as her state’s attorney general suggest she was willing to overlook the role Facebook, Google, and others played and still play in one of her signature issues: revenge porn. This article makes the case Harris came down hard on a scammer running a revenge porn site but did not press the tech giants with any vigor to take down such material from their platforms. Consequently, the case is made if Harris is former Vice President Joe Biden’s vice presidential candidate, this would signal a go easy approach on large companies even though many Democrats have been calling to break up these companies and vigorously enforce antitrust laws. Harris has largely not engaged on tech issues during her tenure in the Senate. To be fair, many of these companies are headquartered in California and pump billions of dollars into the state’s economy annually, putting Harris in a tricky position politically. Of course, such pieces should be taken with a grain of salt since it may have been suggested or planted by one of Harris’ rivals for the vice president nomination or someone looking to settle a score.
  • Inside Big Tech’s Years-Long Manipulation Of American Op-Ed Pages” – Big Technology from Alan Krantowitz. To no great surprise, large technology companies have adopted a widely used tactic of getting someone sympathetic to “write” an op-ed for a local newspaper to show it is not just big companies pushing for a policy. In this case, it was, and likely still is, the argument against breaking up the tech giants or regulating them more closely. In one case, it is not clear the person who allegedly “wrote” the article actually even knew about it.
  • Trump campaign pushes Facebook ads bashing TikTok” – CNN. The White House is using new means to argue TikTok poses a threat to Americans and national security: advertisements on Facebook by the Trump campaign. The ads repeated the same basic message that has been coming out of the White House that TikTok has been denying: that the app collects and sends user sensitive user data to the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Another wrinkle TikTok pointed to is that Facebook is readying a competitor, Instagram Reels, set to be unveiled as early as this week.

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